Greenfield Community College

Greenfield Community College

Events on Thursday October 19

Alcohol & Drug Awareness Fact Day

Thursday October 19

11:30am-1:00pm

East Building Lobby

Stop by and meet representatives from the Recover Project. The Recover Project is one of ten recovery support centers funded by the Bureau of Substance Abuse Services in Massachusetts. Their mission is to provide trauma informed supports based on the guiding principles that people can and do recover from alcohol and drug addiction and that competence and wisdom reside in those with lived experience. The Wellness Center Learning Support Counselor will be joining the Recover Project and will have a variety of helpful information and resources related to alcohol and drug awareness available.

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College Visit: Granite State College

Thursday October 19

11:30am-1:00pm

Core Lobby

Admissions reps share information about transfer to Granite State College in New Hampshire.

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Recovery Meeting

Thursday October 19

12:00pm-1:00pm

E101 Community Support Studio

Support meeting for individuals in recovery every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Tuesday and Wednesday are "All Recovery" meetings, Thursday is Refuge Recovery.

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Punishment in the Early American Republic

Thursday October 19

2:00pm-4:00pm

GCC Downtown

Part of our Senior Symposia program for people over 50. All workshops are $10. Online registration available!

The penitentiary system in early 18th century America exploited racial ideologies, gender norms, and antipathy towards the poor to justify its existence and expansion. The first of the early penitentiaries was founded in Philadelphia in 1790 and functioned as a way to regulate the poor, especially poor women, indentured servants and African Americans, who attempted to lay claim to the new nation’s promise of liberty. Criminal convictions were harsh on those charged with violating vagrancy laws, minor theft, or disorderly conduct. In this pattern, we see a precursor to the dramatic growth of the U.S. prison system in the last forty years. Jen Manion is Associate Professor of History at Amherst College and author of Liberty’s Prisoners: Carceral Culture in Early America (2015), which received the 2016 Mary Kelley Best Book Prize from the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic. Manion received a Ph.D. in history from Rutgers University. She is co-editor of Taking Back the Academy: History of Activism, History as Activism (2004).

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Medicine in Franklin County: 1750 to 1850

Thursday October 19

7:00pm-8:00pm

Stinchfield Lecture Hall

Dr. Paul Berman provides an overview of the types of medical care that would have been available in Franklin County between 1750 to 1850. The program will explore the theory of disease, therapeutics, alternative medicine, medical education, followed by an introduction to the physicians who practiced during these years, their backgrounds, libraries and way of life. Free and open to the public. 

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Questions? Send us a message!