Greenfield Community College

Greenfield Community College

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This search will show you course descriptions from the academic catalog only. For current course availability, as well as one-time courses that may not be included in the catalog, please search our class schedule. Also view our course periodicity chart for an overview of which classes are offered in which terms.

MAT 014 Preparatory Course for Statistics – 1 credit

Develops necessary intermediate algebraic skills and concepts for students to be successful in an introductory statistics course. Topics include graphing in the Cartesian coordinate system with particular stress on slope and graphing linear equations. Other topics include solving linear equations, creating and interpreting scatter plots, ratio and proportion, dimensional analysis, modeling real-world phenomena and problem-solving. NOTE: This course may not be used to fulfill degree or certificate requirements. Students may earn credit for MAT 014 or MAT 014S but not for both.

(Offered: Every Term)Prereq: MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S or satisfactory placement test scores; ENG 090 or satisfactory placement test score or concurrent enrollment; ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test score. Placement tests are used only for initial course placement, see catalog for details.

MAT Basic Mathematics Skills Self-Paced – 3 credits

An alternative to MAT 090 for students who are highly motivated, goal oriented and able to independently move through the course material. Students set their own deadlines; instructor assistance is available during class and Math Studio time. Students use an online homework system both in and out of class. This course is useful as a foundation for math and math related courses, for developing quantitative job skills, or as a refresher. Students use a variety of materials and problem-solving techniques to deepen their understanding of basic arithmetic operations, whole numbers, fractions, decimals, ratios, rates, proportions, and percents. Students analyze problems and arrive at solutions using the techniques of mathematical reasoning. Students practice mathematical discovery and develop study skills for math. NOTE: Students can enroll in this course at any time during the semester (based on seat availability) and work as quickly as they wish to complete the course during the semester. This course may not be used to fulfill degree or certificate requirements. A grade of C minus or higher is required to pass this course (Ds are not awarded). Students may receive credit for MAT 090S or MAT 090 (MAT 100), but not for both. Special Requirement: Students need access to high-speed internet for homework.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None. Recomm: ENG 094 or satisfactory placement test score

MAT 090 Basic Mathematics Skills – 3 credits

Useful as a foundation for math and math related courses, for developing quantitative job skills, or as a refresher. Students use a variety of materials and problem-solving techniques to deepen their understanding of basic arithmetic operations, whole numbers, fractions, decimals, ratios, rates, proportions, and percents. Students analyze problems and arrive at solutions using the techniques of mathematical reasoning. Students practice mathematical discovery and develop study skills for math. NOTE: This course may not be used to fulfill degree or certificate requirements. A grade of C minus or higher is required to pass this course (Ds are not awarded). Students may receive credit for MAT 090 (MAT 100), or MAT 090S, but not for both.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: None

ENG 090 College Writing Strategies – 4 credits

Develops the writing strategies, critical thinking skills, research methods, and confidence required in English Composition I and other college-level courses. This course covers word processing and methods of using print texts, electronic texts and databases, as well as techniques for evaluating those resources. This course does not satisfy the English composition requirements of the College and does not fulfill associate degree credit requirements. “C-” is the lowest passing grade in this course.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: None

MAT 094 Preparatory Course for Algebra – 3 credits

A preparatory course for Introductory Algebra, MAT 095 (MAT 105). This course is for students with a working knowledge of arithmetic who have never had algebra before or who would benefit from a slower introduction to algebra. Students study many of the topics covered in Introductory Algebra but at a significantly more elementary level and at a slower pace. Topics include the concept of a variable, negative numbers, numeric and algebraic expressions, linear equations in one variable, positive exponents and square roots, and an introduction to graphing of equations in two variables. Students work with applications to help them understand and connect algebraic concepts to real world situations. NOTE: This course may not be used to fulfill degree or certificate requirements. A grade of C minus or higher is required to pass this course (Ds are not awarded).

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test score; ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test score or concurrent enrollment. Placement tests are used only for initial course placement; see catalog for details. Recomm: If you've never been successful in or it has been decades since you studied introductory algebra or if you received a C or C- in MAT 090 or MAT 090S, then consider taking MAT 094 before taking MAT 095 or MAT 095S.

ENG 094 College Reading Strategies – 4 credits

Develops reading study skills for comprehension, vocabulary building, and critical reading and thinking. Students learn techniques for effectively and efficiently obtaining information from reading materials, especially textbooks. The course covers word processing and methods for conducting research using print texts, electronic texts and databases, as well as techniques for evaluating those resources. This course does not satisfy the English composition requirements of the College and does not fulfill associate degree credit requirements; “C-” is the lowest passing grade in this course. NOTE: Students may receive credit for COL 090 or ENG 094, but not for both.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: None

MAT 095 Introductory Algebra – 3 credits

An introductory algebra course that assumes a working knowledge of basic arithmetic skills. Students study topics that include the concept of a variable, negative numbers, properties of real numbers, numeric and algebraic expressions, linear equations and inequalities in one variable including their graphic representations, ratio and proportion, quadratic equations (with no linear term) in one variable, integer exponents (including scientific notation) and graphing of two-variable equations(by plotting points). Students work with applications throughout the course to help them understand and connect algebraic concepts to real world situations. NOTE: This course may not be used to fulfill degree or certificate requirements. A grade of C minus or higher is required to pass this course (Ds are not awarded).

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores; ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test score or concurrent enrollment. Placement tests are used only for initial course placement; see catalog for details. Recomm: If you've never been successful in or it has been decades since you studied introductory algebra or if you received a C or C- in MAT 090 or MAT 090S, then consider taking MAT 094 before taking MAT 095.

MAT 096 Intermediate Algebra – 4 credits

Develops algebra skills and a conceptual understanding of algebraic topics, and focuses on the relationship between algebraic, graphical, and numeric approaches to solving problems. Students study topics that include linear equations and systems of equations, methods for solving problems, radicals and radical equations, quadratic equations and the quadratic formula, rational exponents and rational expressions. The course places emphasis on graphing in the Cartesian coordinate system with particular stress on graphing linear equations and systems of equations. Students work at times with calculators and/or computers. NOTE: This course may not be used to fulfill degree or certificate requirements. A grade of C minus or higher is required to pass this course (Ds are not awarded).

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S or satisfactory placement test scores; ENG 090 or satisfactory placement test score, or concurrent enrollment; ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test score. Placement tests are used only for initial course placement; see catalog for details.

CIS 096 Keyboarding for Information Processing – 1 credit

An introduction to basic keyboarding skill by touch. Students learn to input alphanumeric information quickly and accurately. Additional topics include the basic vocabulary and concepts of keyboarding operations. Graded credit/no credit.

(Offered: By arrangement)Prereq: None

EGR 100 Engineering Culture – 0 credits

Supports engineering students’ success through student-faculty interaction, peer study groups, and academic and career guidance. NOTE: Students may repeat this course without limit. Special Requirement: Open to Engineering majors only.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None

MUS 101 An Introduction to Music – 3 credits

A survey of musical styles from the Baroque era into the 20th century. Musical forms, elements of music, the orchestra, and great composers are discussed in conjunction with critical listening of recorded examples and live performances.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

MAC 101 Fundamentals of Medical Assisting – 2 credits

An introduction to both the theory and practical skills necessary to assist the physician with clinical and administrative procedures. Students explore the role of the professional medical assistant, the healthcare team, the history of the profession, and credentialing requirement. Course topics include how to obtain patient histories, documentation of procedures, coping skills of the medical assistant, therapeutic communication skills, establishing multicultural communication, the roles played by verbal and non-verbal communication, professional boundaries in the context of providing patient care, while understanding the impact of law and ethics on health care.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094, MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory test scores. Recomm: CIS 140 or concurrent enrollment in CIS 140.

LAT 101 Elementary Latin I – 4 credits

Fundamentals of the Latin language. Students learn Latin vocabulary, syntax, and grammar and then translate Latin into polished English and vice-versa. Students use Latin orally and listen to and write Latin as a part of the language learning process.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: None

HSV 101 Introduction to Human Services – 3 credits

A study of the human service field from historical, ecological, economic, political, and social perspectives. This course familiarizes students with the basic skills, strategies, and functions common to the field through readings, discussions, guest lectures, research, field trips, and service learning projects.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

HSC 101 Introduction to Patient Care Skills – 3 credits

Provides a case based learning methodology through patient simulation and explores a variety of job duties related to health care occupations. Students learn vital signs, sterile techniques, handling of body fluids, body mechanics, Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), first aid and proper chart documentation. Students gain familiarity with research techniques, professionalism, ethics, cultural diversity, and communication skills in healthcare settings.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None

HIS 101 Western Civilization to 1500 A.D. – 3 credits

The major ideas, institutions, and developments of Western Civilization from ancient times to the Renaissance. Themes include the nature of humankind; relationship of the individual to society and the universe; the role of religion; the individual in history; the tradition to modern modes of life and thought.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

GLS 101 Introduction to Global Studies – 3 credits

A survey of contemporary global events and issues through the interdisciplinary lenses of social justice and the environment, American culture and society, art and literature, and international relations. Students develop an awareness of a diversity of cultures and how these cultures and their relationships connect and transform one another.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 101, 103, 0r 105 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 101

GGY 101 Introduction to Geography – 3 credits

Explores major geographic concepts, contemporary world regions and the development of the science of geography. Subjects of discussion range from basic map and globe concepts to population dynamics and economic development. Student use case studies from around the world to increase their awareness of geography.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

GEO 101 Planet Earth – 4 credits

A physical perspective on Earth’s structure, nature, and its geologic evolution. Topics include the origin and classification of minerals and rocks, the role of plate tectonics in shaping Earth while producing hazardous earthquakes and volcanoes, landscape modification through weathering and erosion, mountain building processes, and the methods for and environmental consequences from the extraction of geologic resources (groundwater, fossil fuels, and ores). Local geology is explored on field trips. Special Requirement: Field trips are required. Students assume any travel costs.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

FRE 101 Elementary French I – 4 credits

Fundamentals of French. The course emphasizes acquisition of language functions, vocabulary, structures, and culture through contextualized presentations, interactive activities, and extensive laboratory practice. The instructor speaks French at least 90% of the time in class and also requires students to speak French at least 90% of the time in class.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: None

EVS 101 Environmental Studies: Issues in Sustainability – 3 credits

An introduction to basic concepts and principles in ecology including ecosystems, population, food production, energy, pollution, technology, and resource depletion. The course focuses on people’s impact on the natural environment emphasizing current problems and alternative solutions to them. NOTE: Students may receive credit for HEC 101 or EVS 101, but not for both.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

ENG 101 English Composition I: Expository Writing – 3 credits

Focuses on the writing of essays. This course offers students the opportunity to understand writing as a process and to develop clear, effective presentation of ideas. The student develops an awareness of the relationship between writer and reader. The course includes word processing methods and research and documentation using print and electronic texts. NOTE: Students may receive credit for only ENG 101 or ENG 103 or ENG 105.

(Offered: Every Term)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

EMS 101 Emergency Medical Technician- Basic – 6 credits

Provides training in the primary care of injuries, semiautomatic external defibrillator (AED), acute illnesses, birth, and people in emergency situations. Students learn rescue extrication, transportation, communication, medical-legal aspects, and ambulance training. The course is taught using lectures, slides, demonstration, and practice. Students completing the course are eligible for the Massachusetts Basic EMT examination.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

EGT 101 Technical Mathematics I – 3 credits

An introduction to the foundations of technical mathematics with emphasis on the application of basic mathematical skills in the solution of occupational and engineering problems. Topics include fundamentals of general math, whole number operations, common fractions, decimal fractions, ratios and proportions, percentages, tolerances, scientific notation, units of measurement with their conversions, and an introduction to algebra. The instructor trains the student in the use of graphing scientific calculators. The course is for industrial oriented employees and those wanting employment in these fields. NOTE: EGT designated courses do not count for any MAT credit or placement into MAT designated courses.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores; MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores.

EDU 101 Introduction to Early Childhood Education – 3 credits

A background and overview of important elements in the field of early education and care (EEC) including an historical perspective, key theoretical and philosophical approaches to learning and development, and program models and types. Topics include domains of development and learning, the role of culture, community, diversity, adults and peers on child development, the concept of play, responsibilities of the profession and current issues in EEC. Students must complete 2 hours of field observation in an early education and care program approved by the program coordinator. Students provide their own transportation. NOTE: A grade of C- or higher is required in order to proceed to courses with a prerequisite of EDU 101 (i.e. EDU 201, EDU 215).

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

ECO 101 Principles of Macroeconomics – 3 credits

A study of economic analysis of the national and global economy with discussion of current issues. This course includes business cycles, unemployment, inflation, economic growth, banking systems, monetary and fiscal policies.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090), and MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S or satisfactory placement test scores.

DAN 101 Introduction to Dance – 3 credits

Provides students with an introduction to the fundamentals of dance, and exposure to a wide range of different styles of dance, both western and non-Euro-American. The course includes a daily technique class with instructor or guest teacher, lectures and class discussions, video viewing, and outside-of-class reading assignments. Styles of dance introduced and experienced in the course may include: jazz, ballet, African, tap, Middle Eastern dance, Isadora Duncan dance, social and folk dance, modern, Classical Indian dance, Renaissance, and Baroque dance.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: None

CRJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice – 3 credits

Examines the agencies and processes involved in the criminal justice system, including but not limited to the legislature, the police, the prosecution, the defense, the courts, probation, corrections, and social service agencies designed to function in the context of the criminal justice system. The course examines public policy concerns the system is intended to address, with a special emphasis on the tension between public safety and the due process rights of the accused, and the role that class, poverty, race, gender and other statuses might play in the effectiveness of the criminal justice system.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

ASL 101 Elementary American Sign Language I – 4 credits

Presents basic grammatical rules in the use of American Sign Language. The course covers basic ASL vocabulary, manual alphabet/numbers, visual-gestural communication, and information related to deaf culture. Students develop basic competence in receptive and expressive use of ASL. Students and teacher use ASL in the class to communicate.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

AHS 101 Art History Survey I – 3 credits

A survey of the history of art from pre-history through the Gothic period. Topics include an introduction to the vocabulary of art through contemporary forms, with an emphasis on developing visual awareness of formal elements, aesthetics, and the components of style; an examination of the role of the artist in society and culture; and of the importance of art throughout history. NOTE: Students may receive credit for ART 103 or AHS 101, but not for both.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 101, 103, or 105 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 101, 103 or 105

PCS 101 Public Speaking – 3 credits

Principles of public speaking as communication, stressing the role of the speaker in the communication process. The course emphasizes the proper preparation and delivery of speeches. Each student delivers a minimum of five speeches and participates in small group activities. NOTE: Students may receive credit for PCS 101 or PCS 131, but not both.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: ENG 101, 103, or 105 or concurrent enrollment

PHY 101 General Physics I – 4 credits

An algebra based physics course with topics including vector kinematics, mechanics of particles and rigid bodies, and conservation laws. This course prepares students for further study in the fields of science, mathematics and health professions. Students use physical concepts and mathematical relations to solve physics problems. The course meets in the Physics lab and uses a combination of lecture, demonstrations, discussion, and laboratory exercises. Students develop skills in the use of modern computer software packages and graphing calculators.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: MAT 107, or placement by examination beyond MAT 107, or permission of instructor

POL 101 American Politics – 3 credits

American national government and politics. The principles, processes, and institutions which make up the American political system: constitutional framework; federalism; interest groups, parties, elections; Congress; the Presidency; the judicial system. Policy-making and contemporary problems.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

PSY 101 Principles of Psychology – 3 credits

Introduction to the field of psychology. The student considers topics pertaining to mental processes and behavior, such as theoretical perspectives, research methods, biopsychology, states of consciousness, sensation and perception, learning, cognition, memory, development, motivation, personality, and mental disorders.

(Offered: Every Term)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

SOC 101 Principles of Sociology – 3 credits

An introduction to the discipline of sociology. The course utilizes sociological concepts and theories to examine society and social interaction. Topics include culture, identity, social institutions, and systems of stratification.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

SPA 101 Elementary Spanish I – 4 credits

Fundamentals of Spanish. The course emphasizes acquisition of language functions, vocabulary, structures, and culture through contextualized presentations, interactive activities and extensive laboratory practice. The instructor speaks Spanish at least 90% of the time in class and also requires students to speak Spanish at least 90% of the time in class.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None

SPO 101 Introduction to Sports Management – 3 credits

Emphasizes basic management principles as they relate to the business of sports. Topics include sports marketing, sports law, sports supervision, sports media, sports ethics, recreational sports management and other related areas. Students investigate opportunities and career pathways in this field.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090), and MAT 090 or MAT 090S, or satisfactory placement test scores.

THE 101 Introduction to Theater – 3 credits

An introductory course for students who are interested in theatre and performance but may or may not have any direct experience. The course explores all the basic elements of Theatre Arts: its origins, history, cultural importance and relevance in modern society. It also focuses on each aspect of production: acting, directing, dramaturgy and design. Students read and study major works and have the opportunity to see, discuss, and analyze live performance. The course provides a sampling of the many kinds of experiences that can be had in the Theatre as a practitioner and/or audience member.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

MUS 102 Jazz Eras and Styles – 3 credits

A survey of the evolution of jazz both from an historical and stylistic perspective. The styles illustrated include the origins of jazz from slave songs, marching band, and ragtime through New Orleans, Swing, and Modern Jazz, including the Avant-garde and Rock eras. The teaching methods focus on developing a discerning ear to better understand the different jazz eras and the unique characteristics of each jazz style.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

LAT 102 Elementary Latin II – 4 credits

Fundamentals of the Latin language. Students continue to learn Latin vocabulary, syntax, and grammar and then translate Latin into polished English and vice-versa. Students use Latin orally and listen to and write Latin as a part of the language learning process.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: LAT 101 or equivalent

HIS 102 Western Civilization Since 1500 A.D. – 3 credits

Analysis of ideas, attitudes, and developments of Western Civilization from the dawn of the modern age to the present. Topics include the scientific and industrial revolutions; the rise and triumph of nation states; the French and Russian revolutions; European imperialism in Asia and Africa; socialism, communism, and fascism; dictatorships and World War II; challenge of the non-Western world.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

GEO 102 History of Earth and Life – 4 credits

A historical perspective on the coevolution of Earth and life emphasizing the biogeochemical cycles of major elements that sustain life. This course explores relationships between biological systems and environmental change from the pioneer stromatolites to the giant dinosaurs and woolly mammoths to present-day humans. Topics include geologic time, methods for reconstructing deep history, mass extinctions, interpretation of rocks and fossils, extreme environments, and the potential for life on other planets. NOTE: students may receive credit for GEO 102 or GEO 204, but not for both. Special Requirement: Field trips are required. Students assume any travel costs.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

FRE 102 Elementary French II – 4 credits

Fundamentals of French. The course emphasizes continued acquisition of language functions, vocabulary, structures, and culture through contextualized presentations, interactive activities, video and extensive laboratory practice. The instructor speaks French at least 90% of the time in class and also requires students to speak French at least 90% of the time in class.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: FRE 101 or equivalent.

ESL 102 Writing-Advanced Beginners Level – 3 credits

Focuses on basic writing skills needed for successful participation in American communities, including sentence structure, paragraph structure, mechanics, and introduction to academic writing. Individualized programs are provided as needed. Writing and computer laboratories are required.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: Placement by examination

EGT 102 Technical Mathematics II – 3 credits

An introduction to the foundations of technical mathematics and emphasis on the application of basic mathematical skill in the solution of occupational and engineering problems. Topics include algebraic operations, system of equations, quadratic equations; the Cartesian coordinate system and graphs of linear equations; plane geometry including angular measure, circles, and polygons; area and volume of common geometric figures such as cylinders, pyramids and spheres; understanding data using bar, circle, line graphs and an introduction to trigonometry. NOTE: EGT designated courses do not count for any MAT credit or placement into MAT designated courses.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: EGT101 with minimum grade of C-

ECO 102 Principles of Microeconomics – 3 credits

A study of the economics of the firm, the consumer, and their interaction in the domestic and global marketplace. This course includes resource allocation, supply and demand, elasticity, market structure, labor, market failure, and an economic perspective of current issues facing consumers, business, and society.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090), and MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S or satisfactory placement test scores

DAN 102 Pilates Mat Work – 1 credit

An introduction to the unique series of core strengthening exercises designed by Joseph Pilates. Pilates Mat exercises combine strengthening and stretching to increase core strength and muscle tone. Through the practice of these exercises, students develop an understanding of functional anatomy while improving flexibility, joint mobility, balance, and posture. NOTE: Students may repeat this course once for a maximum of two credits.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None

BUS 102 Career Planning and Job Search Skills – 1 credit

Introduces students to concepts and tools necessary for developing and implementing a personal education and career plan and effective job search strategies. Special Requirement: Field Trips. Students assume any travel costs.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: CIS 140 or concurrent enrollment in CIS 140.

BIO 102 Botany – 4 credits

An introduction to the study of plants through exploring the structure and function of roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits, and seeds. Students study the processes of reproduction, respiration, photosynthesis, and inheritance. In the laboratory, students study the structure and function of live and preserved plant materials as they relate to lecture subjects.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

ASL 102 Elementary American Sign Language II – 4 credits

A continuation of ASL 101, designed to further develop students’ proficiency in frequently used signs. The course offers students the opportunity for individual hands on experience in language learning. The course emphasizes a study of cultural behaviors, values, and norms. The course uses video text to improve conversational skills and preserve the integrity of the language. Students and teacher use ASL in the class to communicate.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ASL 101 or equivalent, or permission of instructor

AHS 102 Art History Survey II – 3 credits

A survey of the history of art from the early Renaissance in Europe to the contemporary International scene. Topics include the study of art from non-western cultures; an examination of the role of the artist in society and culture; and of the importance of art throughout history. NOTE: Students may receive credit for ART 104 or AHS 102, but not for both.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: AHS 101 or permission of the instructor

PHY 102 General Physics II – 4 credits

A continuation of PHY 101, non-calculus treatment of the fields of light, electricity, and magnetism, and atomic and nuclear physics with some topics from modern physics. Lab required.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: PHY 101 or permission of instructor

SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II – 4 credits

Fundamentals of Spanish. The course emphasizes continued acquisition of language functions, vocabulary, structures, and culture through contextualized presentations, interactive activities, video and extensive laboratory practice. The instructor speaks Spanish at least 90% of the time in class and also requires students to speak Spanish at least 90% of the time in class.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: SPA 101 or equivalent.

NUR 103 Fundamentals of Practical Nursing – 10 credits

Provides the basic principles of safe, caring and competent nursing care in classroom, laboratory, and structured health care settings. The course introduces the nursing process as a holistic, problem solving approach to studying physiological and psychosocial adaptations common to many health problems experienced across the lifespan. The course emphasizes nursing concepts such as cultural aspects of nursing care, health promotion, legal and ethical issues, documentation and role of the practical nurse. The course includes nursing skills and interventions including those related to nutrition, pharmacology, safety, infection control, wound care, surgery, mobility, aging, grief and therapeutic communication.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: PNC majors only. BIO 194 or BIO 216 (BIO 196) or concurrent enrollment; and PSY 101 or concurrent enrollment

MUS 103 Music Theory Fundamentals – 3 credits

Introductory music theory for students with little or no musical background. The course covers reading and writing notation, scales, melodic composition, and other elementary theoretical concepts.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

MAC 103 Medical Office Procedures – 3 credits

An introduction to the procedures common to medical office work, including modern office technology, appointment scheduling, billing, insurance and collection, basic accounting, patient reception and processing, customer-service oriented communication, and the use of electronic medical record (EMR) systems. Course topics include managed care policies and procedures, third-party guidelines, patient care ethics, administrative laws such as The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), and the development of interpersonal communication and organizational skills to work professionally in a medical office. NOTE: students may receive credit for either MAC 103 or MOM 215, but not for both.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: CIS140; ENG 101, 103 or 105.

GEO 103 Valley Geology – 4 credits

An introduction to the unique geology and geohistory of our region. Topics include rocks, minerals, rivers, glaciers, dinosaurs, continental drift, resources, and geologic hazards. Special Requirement: Field trips are required. Students assume any travel costs.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

ESL 103 Written English-Intermediate Level – 3 credits

Develops students’ writing skills for academic and professional use, such as patterns of organizing paragraphs and compositions, basic business letters, exercises in sentence structure and other composition skills. Writing and computer laboratories are required.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ESL 102 or placement by examination

EDU 103 Creativity and Creative Experiences with Young Children – 3 credits

Examines the concept of creativity and its important role in thinking, communicating, learning, and development. Course content makes connections between theory and practice in the early childhood context and explores the role of various genres, tools, and materials for creative thinking and expression. Students participate in hands-on studio experiences across multiple genres and materials.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores; ECE major, or permission of instructor

DAN 103 Jazz Dance I – 3 credits

An introductory course in jazz dance. Classes consist of a full body warm up, and basic dance exercises to improve strength, flexibility, balance and coordination. Students learn and practice the movement vocabulary essential to the jazz style, including body isolations, propulsive and syncopated rhythms, and standard jazz style traveling steps. The course presents the history of jazz dance as a fusion form with African roots, and its impact on concert dance and the entertainment industry through lecture, video viewing, outside of class reading and writing assignments, or performance attendance.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None

CRJ 103 Criminal Law – 3 credits

Examines the legal definition of crime and defenses; the presumption of innocence and proof beyond a reasonable doubt; purposes and functions of substantive criminal law, including statutes, constitutions and criminal procedure; historical foundations of criminal law, and the limits of criminal law.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

PHI 103 Introduction to Philosophy – 3 credits

Introduction to the major, classical philosophical problems through a thematic approach. Emphasis on active, informal discussion of contemporary issues.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

POL 103 Comparative Politics – 3 credits

An exploration of political systems in several nation states in various regions of the world. Students gain conceptual tools to analyze and understand diverse political systems, beliefs, ideologies and practices. Students describe and analyze generalized comparative approaches, considering issues and challenges of political and economic development. Students compare case histories of various political systems to promote engagement and reflection on the meaning and implications of globalization. Students examine political institutions and processes, political culture, leaders, parties, elections and political participation in each country studied.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

SCI 103 Astronomy – 4 credits

An introductory course in Astronomy. Students examine the history of the universe from 13.7 billion years ago to the present. Concepts include the nature of space and time, Quasars, galaxies, stars, star systems, planets, life, and how each has changed over time. Coursework involves independent article reviews, research, observing and reporting. Students learn to work with mathematical formulas and use scientific calculators.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090), and MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores

MUS 104 Jazz and Pop Chorus – 2 credits

A performing vocal ensemble focusing on jazz and popular music choral repertoire. Students rehearse selections from various periods and styles with piano or band accompaniment. The group performs at least two public concerts each semester. The course is open to all students and previous choral experience is not required. NOTE: Students may repeat this course three times for a maximum of 8 credits.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None

GEO 104 Introduction to Oceanography – 4 credits

The nature of the ocean realm-its physical, chemical, biologic, and geologic characteristics and importance. Topics to be discussed: origin and characteristics of ocean basins, physical and chemical nature of sea water, origin and movement of water masses, importance of the oceans to life on earth. Lab and Field trips are required. NOTE: Students may receive credit for GEO 104 or GEO 105, but not for both.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

ESL 104 Written English-Advanced Level – 3 credits

Emphasizes advanced writing skills in preparation for beginning-level college courses, such as research paper, reading and writing responses, essays, compositions, and grammar of advanced sentence structure. Writing and computer laboratories are required.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ESL 103 or placement by examination

EGT 104 Digital Logic and Applications – 2 credits

Introduces the technology of digital logic functional blocks, their implementations, and applications to mathematical computation. This course is a project oriented hardware module that introduces the binary number system and shows how students can combine digital logic functions to produce mathematical functions. NOTE: This 7 week course is taught concurrently with the first half of EGR 105 and includes assignments, outcomes, and expectations appropriate for the shorter instruction time, and has differing prerequisites.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores; MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores.

DAN 104 Jazz Dance II – 3 credits

A continuation of the study and practice of the basic elements of dance, with emphasis on movement vocabulary essential to the jazz style. The course presents the history of jazz dance as a fusion form with African roots, and its impact on concert dance and the entertainment industry through lecture, video viewing, outside of class reading and writing assignments, or performance attendance.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: DAN 103, or permission of instructor

BIO 104 Natural History – 4 credits

An introductory study of plants, fungi and animals in their natural environment including the historical and biological processes that have led to the present day landscape of southern New England. Topics may include a survey of local flora and fauna, species identification, evolution, ecology and conservation, food webs, disturbance history and interpretation, animal tracks and signs, and water resources. Field trips to local natural history sites and a project focusing on a natural area enhance student observation skills and understanding of class topics. Special Requirement: Students must possess the ability to traverse uneven landscapes. Field trips required. Students assume travel costs.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090), and MAT 090 or MAT 090S, or satisfactory placement test scores

ANT 104 Cultural Anthropology: Tribes, States and the Global System – 3 credits

An introduction to basic concepts of cultural anthropology. Students compare cultures of increasing scale and investigate specific universal issues related to why cultures change, who benefits from such change, and the costs of such changes. The course begins with an introduction to anthropological fieldwork, and continues with the description and analysis of different cultures representing domestic-scale autonomous tribal societies; politically organized, class-based systems and ancient empires; and global, industrial market based civilizations.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

PHI 104 Introduction to Ethics – 3 credits

Introduces the philosophical, theological, and theoretical foundations of ethics. The course surveys the range of applications in contemporary society including business, law, government, health care, and the media. It also examines specific issues such as distributive justice, capital punishment, Just War Theory, and cultural relativism.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

NUR 105 Practical Nursing Practicum – 2 credits

Provides direct application of all the basic principles learned in NUR 103, BIO 194 and PSY 101. The course emphasizes the application of nursing concepts, skills, interventions and therapeutic communication principles to the delivery of holistic nursing care in structured health care settings.

(Offered: Every January)Prereq: NUR 103; BIO 117 or BIO 194; PSY 101

MAC 105 Clinical Procedures – 4 credits

An introduction to the knowledge and clinical procedures performed by medical assistants, including patient instruction for diagnostic procedures, phlebotomy for lab tests, electrocardiography, assisting the physician with office procedures and the physical exam, and assisting with minor surgery in the ambulatory care setting, while understanding the importance of sterilization, infectious agents and infection control. Develop an understanding of Occupation Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)-require safety precautions, personal protective equipment (PPE), forms of asepsis, quality control and handling of microbiological specimens, use of Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-waived tests, precautions taken with regard to body fluids, and the role of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) regulations in the healthcare setting. Students learn to develop an environmental safety plan and participate in a mock environmental exposure event, while documenting steps taken. This is a lab course.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores; MAC 112 or BIO 194 or BIO 216 (BIO 196) with a C or better, within the last 5 years or concurrent enrollment in MAC 112 or BIO 194 or BIO 216. Recomm: CIS 140; ENG 101, 103, or 105.

HIS 105 History of the American People to 1865 – 3 credits

Economic, social, and cultural development of the American people prior to the Civil War. Utopianism; the Revolutionary Era; the development of national consciousness; consensus and conflicts; constitutionalism; the roots of American foreign policy; race relations; slavery and war. NOTE: Students may receive credit for HIS 105 or 107, but not for both.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

GCC 105 Understanding College Culture – 3 credits

An introduction to the academic and social aspects of college for current high school students considering or planning to attend college. Students visit college classes, interview professors and students, learn about student support services, and use the study of literature to reflect on their own learning styles, expectations, and goals.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: must be currently enrolled in high school

EMS 105 Principles of Advanced Life Support – 5 credits

Introduces the certified EMT to principles of Department of Transportation Advanced Life Support curriculum. Students study roles and responsibilities, EMS systems, legal and ethical issues, patient assessment, fundamentals of respiration and advanced airway management. The course includes the fundamentals of perfusion and techniques of intravenous therapy.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: PMC majors only. Current EMT certification. ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090) and MAT 090 or MAT 090S, or satisfactory placement test scores.

EGT 105 Robotics Control – 2 credits

A study in the control of robotic machines, using mechanical structures and programming techniques, to fulfill control parameters. NOTE: This 7 week course is taught concurrently with the second half of EGR 105 and includes assignments, outcomes, and expectations appropriate for the shorter instruction time and differing prerequisites.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores; MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores.

EGR 105 Introduction to Engineering, Science, Technology, and Society – 4 credits

A survey introductory course that combines hands-on experience with sociological analysis of engineering, science, and technology using lab, lecture, research, design, and discussion. Includes aspects of electrical, mechanical, environmental, civil, and chemical engineering. NOTE: Students may receive credit for EGR 105 or SCI 105, but not for both.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: MAT 107 or concurrent enrollment in MAT 107 or satisfactory placement test scores; ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: Any 3-credit course from the list of Behavioral and Social Sciences General Education Electives in the college catalog.

ECO 105 Sports and Stadium Economics – 3 credits

An economic analysis of sports teams, leagues, and institutions. Topics include gate receipts, media sales, product licensing, stadium revenues, competitive balance, and revenue sharing arrangements. Emphasis is placed on retail and facility operations in the context of professional league organizational structures. NOTE: Students may receive credit for either ECO 105 or ECO 205, but not for both.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090) and MAT 095 (MAT 105), or MAT 095S, or satisfactory placement test scores.

DAN 105 African Dance I – 1 to 3 credits

An introductory course in African Dance. Students learn traditional movements, rhythms, and dances from a variety of African cultures and countries. Lectures on African history, geography, and culture provide a background for understanding the importance of dance in African life. Assignments may include attending performances outside of class. NOTE: Students may earn a total of three credits in DAN 105.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: None

CRJ 105 Police Process – 3 credits

Provides the student an appreciation of the social and historical perspectives on American Policing. Topics include a critical study of the police role, career, discretion, values; normal and deviant behavior; ethical and moral issues; diversity, ethnicity, and race. The course analyzes the challenges of policing in a democratic society with a discussion of interagency relations.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: CRJ 101 or permission of instructor. Recomm: CRJ 103

CHE 105 Basic Principles of Chemistry – 3 credits

A survey course for students interested in the basics of chemistry from a descriptive point of view. Topics include matter, properties of families of compounds and their characteristic compounds, mixtures, acids and bases, chemical reactions, introductory biochemistry, and environmental effect of chemistry. This course could be the basis for coursework in selected technical areas but is not a substitute for CHE 111, 112.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090), and MAT 090 or MAT 090S, or satisfactory placement test scores

BUS 105 Personal Financial Literacy – 3 credits

Fundamentals of financial planning are presented to prepare students to make informed choices related to spending, saving, borrowing, and investing that lead to long-term financial security. Students learn to identify and evaluate choices as well as understand the consequences of their decision. Topics include the management of personal and family finances, budgeting, consumer buying, personal credit, savings and investment, home ownership, insurance and retirement planning.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores; MAT 090 or MAT 090S, or placement by examination.

POL 105 International Politics – 3 credits

Traditional principles of international relations and emerging new problems from a political perspective – population, environment, energy, natural resources, economic interdependence, rapid technological change. Provides a global context for dealing with new and developing international considerations.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

THE 105 Play Analysis – 3 credits

Concentrates on the interpretation and analysis of various types of dramatic literature. Students learn to explore and respond to plays effectively in the context of dramaturgical elements such as plot, theme, character development, structure and other critical components specific to the genre. The course covers a variety of traditional and contemporary forms and texts. Students also explore the challenges and opportunities of translating these texts into live production and film.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

HIS 106 History of the American People Since 1865 – 3 credits

Reconstruction; industrialism and triumphant capitalism; the capitalist model of society; business and the protestant ethic; labor, populism, and dissent; imperial expansion and the progressive politics; crisis in the American Dream; The Great Depression and the New Deal; minorities and change; the roots of contemporary American foreign policy to Vietnam. NOTE: Students may receive credit for HIS 106 or 108, but not for both.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

HFW 106 Principles of Strength Training I – 1 credit

Covers the basic training principles involved in the development of muscle strength and endurance. The student performs basic setup and execution of exercises performed with machines, free weights and body weight movements. The course emphasizes the value of a lifetime goal of physical fitness. NOTE: Students may receive credit for HFW 106 or LED 156 but not for both. Special Requirement: Students participate in movement every class. Specific footwear and clothing requirements will be discussed in the first class session, or students may email the instructor prior to class for further information.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None

ESL 106 English Grammar-Advanced Beginners – 3 credits

Focuses on the systematic study of basic English grammar patterns through reading, writing, listening, and discussion. Individualized programs are provided as needed. Laboratory is required.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: Placement by examination

SOC 106 Social Inequality – 3 credits

Introduces students to the theories and fundamental concepts of social diversity and social stratification in the United States. Through an individual, cultural, and systemic lens, students examine the construction of identities, including race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, class, and dis/ability. This course provides a sociological understanding of the social construction of difference and inequality and combines cognitive and experiential learning to promote recognition, understanding, and acknowledgement of disparate experiences of equality in the United States.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores; Recomm: SOC 101

THE 106 Stage Craft – 3 credits

The study of the processes of scenery, lighting, and sound design for production realization from the stage designer’s point of view. The course emphasizes the creative process in developing the physical elements of a theatrical production. The student learns how to safely execute the skills of the scenic designer in a hands-on method and work environment. Students aid in the construction and technical work required for GCC’s mainstage production, student- directed projects, or an off-campus, instructor-approved theater facility.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

NUR 107 Nursing Care of Clients and Families – 10 credits

Focuses on the role of the practical nurse in the delivery of basic therapeutic, restorative and preventive nursing care in structured health care settings. The course emphasizes clients and their families as holistic beings adapting to common, well-defined health problems. The student uses the nursing process as a framework to study physiological and psychosocial health problems as they affect clients of all ages. The course provides instruction on anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology; physiologic changes related to all ages; nursing assessment, diagnosis and intervention, diagnostic tests and procedures; common therapeutic measures and patient education. The course includes vocational trends and entry into practice issues.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: NUR 105; PSY 217 or concurrent enrollment

MUS 107 Music Theory I – 3 credits

Basic chordal structures, voice leading, inversions, figured bass, harmonic progressions, and non-harmonic tones. Harmonic analysis of great composers’ works. Keyboard harmony and ear training.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: MUS 103 or permission of instructor

MAT 107 College Algebra – 4 credits

The study of functions. This course is a gateway to the study of higher level mathematics and a useful preparation for courses with quantitative content. Students investigate the principles, properties, and applications of several common types of functions from numerical, algebraic, and graphical perspectives and use these functions to model real world problems. Principle types include polynomial, rational, composite and inverse functions. The course also introduces exponential and logarithmic functions and briefly examines absolute value, root, step, and piecewise functions. Students use graphing calculators extensively.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: MAT 096 (MAT 106) or MAT 096S or satisfactory placement test scores; ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores. Placement tests are used only for initial course placement; see catalog for details.

HSV 107 Introduction to Addiction Studies – 3 credits

An introduction to the history of addiction treatment and recovery in the United States from the nineteenth century through to the present day. Topics include: recovery movements, the birth of addiction treatment, psychological approaches, the 12 step model, and modern addiction treatment, with an emphasis on understanding a variety of models and theories of addiction along with an attitudinal appreciation of the complexity inherent in understanding addiction. The social, political, economic and cultural contexts are also discussed, with an emphasis on the risk and resiliency factors for individuals and groups.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores.

ESL 107 American English Grammar in Context – 3 credits

The study of intermediate-level grammar patterns in English, with focus on verb tenses and on parts of speech. This course emphasizes recognition and understanding of grammar patterns in reading and speech, and the development of grammar skills in writing. Laboratory is required.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ESL 106 or placement by examination

EGT 107 Technical Graphics – 2 credits

An introduction to technical graphics concepts and applications. Concepts include lettering, scaling, orthographic projection, pictorials, sections, auxiliary views, dimensioning, tolerances, and fasteners. Students utilize sketching and some instrument work. NOTE: This 7 week course is taught concurrently with the first half of EGR 107 and includes assignments, outcomes, and expectations appropriate for the shorter instruction time and differing prerequisites.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores; MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores.

EGR 107 Engineering Graphics – 4 credits

An introduction to engineering graphics concepts and applications. Topics covered include lettering, scaling, orthographic projection, pictorials, sections, auxiliary views, dimensioning, tolerances, fasteners, isometric and orthographic depiction. The course includes Computer Aided Design, manual drafting, and sketching.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090), and MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S or satisfactory placement test scores

DAN 107 Ballet I – 3 credits

An introduction to the study of classical ballet. Students learn the ballet terminology that denotes the traditional positions of the feet, arms, and body, and the basic ballet steps. Each class includes barre work, center floor exercises to improve balance and coordination, and traveling across the floor combinations incorporating jumps and leaps. The course presents the rich history and theory of ballet, and its widespread cultural impact through lectures, video viewing, outside of class reading and writing assignments, or performance attendance.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None

CRJ 107 Adjudication Process – 3 credits

Examines the role of prosecution, public defense and the courts; basic elements of the substantive criminal law; procedural law and its relation to constitutional guarantees; and an analysis of trial and pretrial process, case law, rules of evidence and the appellate process.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: CRJ 101 and 103, or permission of instructor

AHS 107 History of Modern Art – 3 credits

A survey of modern art from Post-Impressionism to the present. Topics include major expressions in painting, sculpture, performance, installation, architecture; an examination of the role of the artist in society and culture; and of the importance of art throughout modern history. NOTE: Students may receive credit for ART 107 or AHS 107, but not for both.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 101, 103 or 105

PHI 107 World Religions – 3 credits

An introduction to world religions, exploring myths and symbols, rituals and practices, and varieties of religious experience. The course explores Western, non-Western, and indigenous traditions as well as secular and atheist thinkers. Students consider whether and how these traditions may contribute to the modern world, and how to promote constructive, interfaith dialogue.

(Offered: Spring in even numbered years)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

MUS 108 Music Theory II – 3 credits

Dominant seventh and extended chords in root position and inversions. Modulation to closely related keys. Harmonic analysis of great composers’ works. Keyboard harmony and ear training.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: MUS 107 or permission of instructor

MAT 108 Precalculus – 4 credits

A preparation for MAT 201 and the physical sciences. Students study principles, properties, and applications of functions and their graphs. They revisit functions introduced in MAT 107 and expand their knowledge of them. The course focuses heavily on circular trigonometric functions and introduces conic sections. Laboratory activities place particular emphasis on the use of functions to model real problems. Computers and/or graphing calculators are used to enhance the study of mathematics.

(Offered: Every Spring & Summer)Prereq: A grade of C- or better in MAT 107 or satisfactory placement test scores; ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores. Placement tests are used only for initial course placement; see catalog for details.

HUM 108 Introduction to Topics in Humanities – 3 credits

A one-semester course concentrating on a specified topic or period in the humanities (art, dance, geography, history, language, literature, music, philosophy, and theater). Students learn about the disciplines of the humanities that influence and are influenced by culture, and how the interplay of passion and creativity combine to give meaning and identity to perspectives of society. Topics or major themes are announced each semester.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores, or concurrent enrollment

HFW 108 Personal Fitness Training – 1 credit

Helps students at all fitness levels learn safe and proper exercise techniques and the importance of nutrition to promote a healthy lifestyle. The course introduces a circuit of calisthenic and dynamic movements for a whole body workout that includes strength and cardiovascular endurance. Participants progress at their own pace through the course activities. NOTE: Students may receive credit for LED 157 or HFW 108 but not for both. Special Requirement: Students participate in movement every class. Specific footwear and clothing requirements will be discussed in the first class session, or students may email the instructor prior to class for further information.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None

ESL 108 American English Grammar in Use – 3 credits

Continued study of English verb tenses and parts of speech. The course includes practice of other complex patterns needed for college coursework in English as well as a review of articles and advanced sentence structure. Students will learn accurate and appropriate use of grammar patterns in writing. Laboratory is required.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ESL 107 or placement by examination

DAN 108 Ballet II – 3 credits

A continuation of the study of classical ballet. Students learn and apply the ballet terminology that denotes the traditional position of the feet, arms, and body, and the basic ballet steps. Students further develop competence in barre work, center floor exercises to improve balance and coordination, and traveling across the floor combinations incorporating jumps and leaps. Students learn to execute single pirouettes, and other traveling turns. The course presents the rich history and theory of ballet, and its widespread cultural impact through lectures, video viewing, outside of class reading and writing assignments, or performance attendance.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: DAN 107, or permission of instructor

AHS 108 History of Photography – 3 credits

An introduction to the history of photography from pre-photographic times to its most recent developments. This course presents an overview of major photographers and trends, technological developments, and stylistic analysis. Students examine the social and cultural contexts of photography, as well as critical approaches to photography and the relationship of photography to other art forms. NOTE: Students may receive credit for ART 108 or AHS 108, but not for both.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 101, 103 or 105

SOC 108 Crime & Punishment in the U.S.: A Sociological Overview – 3 credits

An examination of a variety of perspectives on crime and punishment in U.S. society–from personal testimonies to historical accounts, from statistical reports and articles to documentary film and popular media. This interdisciplinary course is appropriate for a wide variety of students in social sciences, criminal justice, humanities, and the arts. Its aim is to cultivate a transformative conversation between students of diverse backgrounds. Topics include: History of incarceration in the U.S., the economics of the contemporary prison system, gender and incarceration, concepts of retributive and restorative justice, race and the legacies of slavery, enfranchisement and education, and shifting attitudes towards crime and punishment. Classes meet at the Franklin County House of Correction (FCHC) in Greenfield.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: Special application and interview process; permission of the instructor/Education Director at FCHC required.

NUR 109 Advanced Concepts in Practical Nursing – 5 credits

Continues to develop the knowledge and skills necessary for utilizing the nursing process through classroom and clinical experience to deliver holistic nursing care to individuals and their families as they adapt to common, well-defined health problems. Course topics include maternal, child and family nursing as well as leadership skills. The course emphasizes integration and application of all previous content in this final course of the curriculum with opportunities to practice supervision and delegation skills in the clinical area.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: NUR 107; PSY 217

ESL 109 Intermediate Grammar Review – 3 credits

An intensive grammar workshop for students who have completed ESL 107 or other intermediate ESL grammar courses. Students practice and master what they have learned about basic English verb tenses, question patterns, and subject-verb agreement. Students review grammar through listening, speaking, pronunciation, reading, writing, group work, and discussion.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ESL 107 or permission of instructor

EGT 109 Dimensional Metrology – 2 credits

An introduction to Metrology, suitable for technicians, inspectors and skilled workers. Students develop understanding and attain skills of use in dimensional measurement abilities. Students use the following: scales, micrometers, calipers, gage blocks, indicators, and production gages. Topics include, basic statistics, acceptance sampling, and calibration with standards tracing.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores; MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores.

CRJ 109 Corrections Process – 3 credits

Examines post-conviction process; the development of correctional philosophy, theory and practice; management; and community-based correctional probation and parole. Special Requirement: Field trips required.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: CRJ 101 or permission of instructor

AGR 109 Organic Gardening – 1 credit

Provides instruction in a natural gardening program and “hands-on” introduction to the basic philosophy, content and methods of organic gardening and permaculture design. Using a model garden site, participants plan and design a garden, prepare the soil, plant the seeds, and prepare for harvesting and storage. Topics include compost, soil improvement, seed selection, crop rotation and plant management. The course includes in-the-field instruction. NOTE: Students may receive credit for only one of the following: EVS 152, HEC 152 or AGR 109.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: None

MOM 110 Medical Terminology – 3 credits

Provides students with an understanding of medical language and a foundation to recognize medical terms in context. The course emphasizes improving written and oral communication skills pertaining to medical terminology and using electronic research to build health informatics skills. Topics include basic anatomical and physiological terms, including those used in disease and surgical and diagnostic procedures. NOTE: Students may receive credit for MOM 110 or ADM 122, but not for both.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

ESL 110 ESL Computer Training – 1 credit

Introduces English terms for basic keyboarding operations. Students develop techniques and concepts for word-processing using both Macintosh and IBM clone computers. ESL students begin to use electronic mail and learn how to find information on the Internet.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: Concurrent enrollment in ESL 103 or permission of instructor

EGT 110 Print Reading – 2 credits

Provides an opportunity for students to learn how to interpret manufacturing drawings and apply these skills to inspection, quality control, and technical analysis of manufactured parts.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores; MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores.

CRJ 110 Contemporary Operational and Inmate Treatment Practices – 3 credits

An exploration of theory and implementation of jail design and inmate management in a correctional setting. The course examines “Cognitive Behavioral Programming” and the use of assessment tools to determine the proper housing and rehabilitative programs for inmates. The course introduces the student to evidence-based research to achieve a measurable and sustained increase in the number of offenders who do not recidivate in the three years following release. The course gives pre-service and in-service corrections professionals the skill set to implement best practices in the daily management of a correctional facility.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: CRJ 109 or permission of instructor

CIS 110 Introduction to Computers – 3 credits

An introduction to computer use for students with little or no experience. The course includes vocabulary, the components of the computer and peripherals, the basics of creating and printing a text document, how to transfer and organize files, manipulate graphics, use email, and avoid viruses. Other topics include: how to search for and evaluate information on the Internet; conduct research on the Internet; avoid Internet scams and identity theft; download and install software; and basic trouble-shooting. NOTE: This course does not satisfy Program Elective or CIS elective requirements in any Business program.

(Offered: By arrangement)Prereq: None

AHS 110 History of Film and Video – 3 credits

Presents the significant contributions of important filmmakers and artists including primary forms such as avant-garde and experimental film, documentary, and video art. Students study film and video works by artists such as Maya Deren, Shirin Neshat, Stan Brakhage, Nam June Paik, and Bill Viola and gain an understanding of the importance of the film medium throughout the history of contemporary culture and society. NOTE: Students may receive credit for ART 110 or AHS 110, but not for both.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 101, 103, or 105

AGR 110 Beekeeping – 1 credit

Provides strategies and techniques for the beginner beekeeper. Topics include: hive construction, life cycle of the honey bee, hive management through the seasons, threats to the health and wellness of bees, diverse approaches and the joys of beekeeping. Special Requirement: Must possess physical ability to use hand tools. Field trip required. NOTE: Students work with bees.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: None

PHI 110 Eastern Religions – 3 credits

An introduction to the fundamental dimensions of religion and the central teachings and practices of Hinduism, Buddhism, and the religions of China and Japan. Through readings, site visits and dialogues with practitioners, students explore how these religions shape both individual lives and modern societies.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

REE 110 Community Energy Solutions – 1 credit

Explores community-based solutions to our current environmental, energy and climate change crises. Students learn the fundamental concepts of energy use and conservation, different regional energy sources and their environmental and economic impacts, with an emphasis on exploring how sustainable energy systems create opportunities for social and economic justice. Students participate in field trips to grass-roots energy projects in the community. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 110 or REE 110, but not for both. Special Requirement: Field trips required.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: None

OLP 111 Introduction to Outdoor Adventure Skills – 4 credits

Develops technical skills in four adventure program areas: backcountry travel, paddling, rock climbing, and challenge course programming. Students observe, imitate, practice and adapt technical and facilitation skills. Students participate in weekly, day-long, local field trips. Special Requirement: This course involves moderate to high physical activity and the ability to be active and in the outdoors for a full day in a remote, forested environment. Off-campus field trips. All students must submit the OLP Health History and Physical Examination Attestation Form, completed and signed by a physician, verifying medical clearance for full participation. Students assume any travel and permit/pass costs associated with field trips.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

NUR 111 Introduction to Nursing Process – 1 credit

Provides the foundation for the advanced placement student to demonstrate holistic assessment practices while stressing the importance of teamwork and collaboration in professional nursing. The course establishes the concept of nursing practice as a scientific method used to provide safe and effective patient-centered care. Special Requirement: Admission as an advanced placement student into the ADN program

(Offered: Every January)Prereq: Successful score on NUR 101 currency exam within 5 years or completion of the GCC PNC Program within 5 years; ENG 101,103, or 105; BIO 215 (BIO 195); PSY 101

MUS 111 Chorus – 2 credits

An exploration of vocal technique and choral repertoire. Students prepare selections from the various style periods for public performance. The course is open to all students. NOTE: Students may repeat this course three times for a maximum of 8 credits.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None

MAC 111 Pharmacology for Medical Assistants – 2 credits

Provides an overview of the pharmacological language, symbols, and abbreviations used to interpret prescriptions, as well as the system of measurements and conversions used to calculate medication dosages. Students learn to prepare, verify and administer doses via oral and parenteral routes. Topics include drug classification, interactions, forms of medication, safety protocols, and the recording, interpretation and analysis of normal and abnormal lab test results. Students receive information appropriate to the Medical Assistant occupation regarding the most commonly prescribed drugs, compliance with drug regulations, quality control of prescription requests, and how to maintain professionalism when communicating with patients and healthcare professionals.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores; BIO 194 with a C or better within the last 5 years; BIO 216 with a C or better within the last 5 years; MAC 112 with a C or better. Recomm; MAT 095 or MAT 095S

EGT 111 CNC Programming with G code – 2 credits

G Code programming for CNC (Computer Numerically Controlled) machines as used in local machine tool industries. Students learn the language syntax and coding to properly control common tools. This course may utilize both virtual machine coding and actual physical production equipment.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 094) or satisfactory placement test scores; MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores.

EDU 111 Introduction to Special Education – 3 credits

Overview of development, physical, and behavioral disabilities; basic principles of intervention techniques; overview of legislation (Chapter 766) and its implications for the young child.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

DAN 111 Contemporary/Modern Dance I – 3 credits

An introduction to contemporary/modern dance. Students learn the terminology and practice the fundamental movement vocabulary of contemporary/modern dance. Classes consist of a full body warm-up, specific dance exercises, traveling step patterns, short dance combinations, and improvisational assignments. Class activities increase strength, flexibility, coordination, rhythmic awareness and musicality, and self expression. The course presents the history, theory and significance of contemporary/modern dance through lectures, video viewing, outside of class reading or writing assignments, or performance attendance.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None

CHE 111 General Chemistry I – 4 credits

Theoretical and descriptive topics of chemistry, including nature of matter, atomic and molecular structure, nuclear stability, periodic properties of the elements, chemical bonding, nomenclature, stoichiometry, gaseous, liquid, and solid states, and thermochemistry. Lab required.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090), MAT 096 (MAT 106) or MAT 096S, or satisfactory placement test scores

BUS 111 Introduction to Business – 3 credits

For students from any field of study who want to explore the study of business, and/or prepare themselves for employment, entrepreneurship, or simply informed consumer decision-making. The course introduces students to the contemporary context of business practices by exploring topics related to globalization, business ethics, entrepreneurship, business plan development, strategic planning, management, marketing, finance, and personal investing.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

AGR 111 Four Season Farming – 1 credit

Explores strategies for extending growing seasons into the fall and winter. Topics include: hoophouses, coldframes, raised beds, mulch, managing seasonal crops, frost proofing, cold hardy crops, early spring greenhouse management, winter snow removal, and seed germination under unheated conditions. Special Requirement: Must possess physical ability to use hand tools. Field trip required.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: None

PHY 111 General Physics I with Calculus – 4 credits

A calculus-based physics course intended primarily for students preparing for careers in science, mathematics, or engineering. Topics covered include kinematics, mechanics of particles and rigid bodies, and conservation laws. The course emphasizes the use of the concepts of physics to solve problems. This course meets in the physics laboratory using a combination of lecture, demonstration, discussion, and laboratory exercise.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: MAT 201 or concurrent enrollment in MAT 201

SPA 111 Spanish Skills Practice I – 2 credits

An intensive immersion workshop conducted in Spanish. For students who have completed at least SPA 101 or who are returning to the study of Spanish. Using the material studied in SPA 101, students practice and internalize the basic building blocks of Spanish in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Class time is spent on pair and small group work, drill, video, readings, and authentic materials.

(Offered: Every January)Prereq: SPA 101 or equivalent or permission of instructor

OLP 112 Wilderness Orientation Expedition for Outdoor Leaders – 4 credits

Provides an introduction to leadership styles, skills, theories, and adventure education concepts and foundations. Topics include intrapersonal, interpersonal and group relations models; core competencies for effective leadership and group dynamics; values and ethics in outdoor leadership. Students participate in a 10-day model wilderness expedition. Special Requirement: This course involves moderate to high physical activity and the ability to be active and in the outdoors for 10 days and nights in a remote, forested environment. Minimum age requirement 18 years for courses involving overnight stays. Off-campus field trips. All students must submit the OLP Health History and Physical Examination Attestation Form, completed and signed by a physician, verifying medical clearance for full participation. Students assume any travel and permit/pass costs associated with field trips.

(Offered: Every Summer)Prereq: OLP Students only; ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

NUR 112 Introduction to Professional Nursing and the Nursing Process – 2 credits

Introduces the concepts of the curriculum framework: cultural competence, professional development, communication, collaboration, clinical reasoning and client-centered care. Utilizing the nursing process as the foundation for professional nursing practice provides licensed practical nurse with the opportunity to demonstrate assessment of client health care status through the use of Gordon’s functional health patterns and physical assessment skills. Nursing care planning for the older adult and maternity client and family are introduced. Comparative discussions related to the care of the pediatric client and family provide an exploration of the pediatric experience. Attention is paid to the LPN to RN transition. Introduces service learning, focusing on a health promotion activity provided in the community.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: Advanced placement into the ADN program with a successful score in the Excelsior Fundamentals and Maternal- Child Nursing exams; ENG 101, 103, or 105; BIO 216 (BIO 196); PSY 217; SOC 101

MAC 112 Human Body in Health and Disease – 3 credits

Provides students with an introduction to basic human anatomy and physiology with an emphasis on structure, function, and the pathology of each body system. Topics include classification, transmission, diagnostic tests, prevention, and treatment of human disease. NOTE: Students who have already passed BIO 215/216 should let their advisor know before registering for this course.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test score Recomm: MOM 110 or concurrent enrollment in MOM 110

ESL 112 Spoken English-Advanced Beginners – 3 credits

Emphasizes development of basic vocabulary, pronunciation, listening and speaking skills needed to communicate in class, in the community, and in social situations. Laboratory is required.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: Placement by examination

ENG 112 English Composition II: Exploring Literature – 3 credits

Builds and extends on the academic writing process and skills introduced in English Composition I. Students develop close reading abilities for a variety of literary and nonliterary texts, and hone critical thinking skills, as well as research and documentation skills using a variety of texts that may include essays, fiction, poetry, and drama among other texts. Writing assignments emphasize the formal researched and documented essay and include creative experiments and literary analysis. Course readings include selections from a wide variety of authors, genres and texts that engage students in analysis and research. NOTE: Students may receive credit for only ENG 112 or ENG 114 or ENG 116.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 101, 103, or 105

EGT 112 Fundamentals of Electricity – 3 credits

An introduction to electricity with an emphasis on sustainable energy applications. Topics include DC/AC circuit operations, electrical distribution systems, common semiconductor devices, the National Electrical Code, electrical safety, and common electrical methods and techniques. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 112 or EGT 112, but not for both. Special Requirement: Field trips required.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S, ENG 090, and ENG 094 (COL 094), or satisfactory placement test scores.

EDU 112 Early Childhood Special Education – 3 credits

Emphasizes the acquisition of strategies and skills to provide developmentally appropriate learning experiences for young children with special needs in multiple settings. Students examine prominent preschool special education curricula and learn to evaluate and adapt curriculum materials to specific learning needs.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

ECO 112 Hospitality Economics – 3 credits

An application of managerial economics to the tourism and hospitality industry. Topics include industry cost ratios and pricing practices in accommodations, event planning, and food and beverage operations. NOTE: Credit may be received for ECO 112 or ECO 212, but not both.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090) and MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S or satisfactory placement test scores.

DAN 112 Contemporary/Modern Dance II – 3 credits

A continuation of the study of contemporary/modern dance. Students gain proficiency in movement fundamentals, learning and performing dance combinations and locomotor movements to various rhythms and styles of music in large and small groups. The course presents the history, theory and significance of contemporary/modern dance through lectures, video viewing, outside of class reading and writing assignments, or performance attendance.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: DAN 111, or permission of instructor

CHE 112 General Chemistry II – 4 credits

Interrelated descriptive and theoretical topics of chemistry, including chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, solubility equilibria, free energy, entropy, equilibrium and free energy, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, environmental impact of chemistry. Some basic chemistry of metals and non-metals, as well as some organic chemistry concepts are covered in this course. Lab required.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: CHE 111; MAT 107 concurrently or placement by examination

BUS 112 Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism – 3 credits

An introduction to the scope, components, development, effects, and future of the hospitality industry. Topics include background on industry structure and overviews of specialized areas relating to the management of food service, lodging, travel, and event planning operations.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

AGR 112 Food Preservation and Storage – 1 credit

Provides strategies and techniques for preserving and storing food. Topics include: kitchen safety, rules for food safety, canning basics, dehydration, cold storage and freezing, food selection, choosing and maintaining equipment, and awareness of local food resources. Special Requirement: Must possess physical ability to use kitchen tools

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: None

PHY 112 General Physics II with Calculus – 4 credits

A calculus-based study of the laws of electricity and magnetism. Topics include properties of electricity and magnetism, fields, elementary electric current analysis, wave motion, electromagnetic waves. This course is taught in the physics laboratory using a combination of lecture, demonstration, discussion, and laboratory exercise.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: PHY 111; MAT 202 or concurrent enrollment in MAT 202

SPA 112 Spanish Skills Practice II – 2 credits

An intensive immersion workshop conducted in Spanish for students who have completed at least SPA 102 or who are returning to the study of Spanish. Using the material studied in SPA 102, students practice in order to internalize the basic building blocks of Spanish in listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

(Offered: Every January)Prereq: SPA 102 or equivalent, or permission of instructor

MAC 113 Phlebotomy for Medical Assistants – 1 credit

Prepares the Medical Assistant student in the performance of venipuncture/phlebotomy procedures for the preparation and collection of diagnostic blood specimens. The course emphasizes the general rules for safety following Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Bloodborne Pathogen standard and guidelines in the collection of high quality specimens. In addition to technical, clerical, and interpersonal skills, the student develops strong organizational skills to handle a heavy workload efficiently and maintain accuracy. This course has a lab component.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: MOM 110 or concurrent enrollment in MOM 110

ESL 113 Spoken English-Intermediate Level – 3 credits

Emphasizes development of vocabulary, pronunciation, listening and speaking skills through group discussions, role plays, oral presentations, and interactive tasks. Content units reflect student interest in social and global issues and in situations from everyday life. Laboratory is required.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ESL 112 or placement by examination

ECO 113 Environmental Economics – 3 credits

Introduction to the contemporary problems of environmental quality. Economic analysis of the institutions and practices leading to pollution of air, water, and land resources. Study of alternative public policies for improving environmental quality.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

CRJ 113 Juvenile Justice – 3 credits

A study of the laws, agencies and processes involved in the juvenile justice system, including the police, the juvenile court, juvenile probation, corrections, as well as a sampling of the social service agencies that function in the context of the juvenile justice system. The course examines the three principle juvenile court systems: delinquency, care and protection, and the child in need of services. The course also explores various sociological and psychological perspectives on child development and socialization, with an emphasis on the roles of class, race, gender, and inculturization.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: CRJ 101 or permission of instructor. Recomm: PSY 101; SOC 101

BUS 113 Fundamentals of Fashion and Textiles – 3 credits

An overview of the history and characteristics of the fashion, apparel, and textile industries. Students explore the process of textile production from the design concept through retail sales for apparel, home furnishings, industrial fabric and geotextiles. Topics include synthetic and natural fiber production, historic fashion influences, garment manufacturing options, design costing and pricing, and the manner in which fashion products are conceived, produced, and offered to the consumer through industry-specific supply chains.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 and MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores.

AGR 113 Mushroom Foraging and Cultivation – 1 credit

Applies permaculture principles in the foraging and cultivation of wild fungi. Field activities include collection, identification, and cultivation of fungi for culinary purposes. Students learn to identify, cook, and preserve safe-to-eat mushrooms using field guides. Students acquire cultivation skills for shiitake, reishi, and/or oyster mushrooms and understand how to integrate mushroom logs into homescale gardens. NOTE: A spring offering focuses more on cultivation while a fall offering focuses more on foraging. Special Requirement: Field trips. Students assume any travel costs.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: None; Recomm: SCI 137

PHY 113 Environmental Physics – 4 credits

Introduces and applies the fundamentals of radiation, thermodynamics, and mechanics to the earth system (atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere). Emphasis is placed on heat and mass transfers in natural and built environments. Students use basic physics principles to solve problems with applications from environmental science, sustainability, and renewable energy systems. This is an algebra-based introductory physics course that prepares students for further study in science and mathematics.

(Offered: Spring in even numbered years)Prereq: MAT 107 or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: MAT 108 and BIO 120

THE 113 Fundamentals of Acting – 3 credits

An introduction to acting with emphasis on characterization, voice, and movement, as well as varieties of acting techniques, script analysis, improvisation, and theatre games. Students prepare monologues, scenework and short one-act plays. The course also emphasizes the uses of acting skills to improve self-confidence and self-expression.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None

MAT 114 Introduction to Statistics – 4 credits

An introduction to statistics that teaches broadly relevant concepts. Topics include but are not limited to graphical and numerical methods for summarizing data; linear regression and correlation; normal probability distributions; confidence intervals; statistical inference and hypothesis testing. Laboratory activities emphasize the analysis of real world data. Students use computer software to enhance the study of mathematics.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: MAT 014 or MAT 014S or MAT 096 (MAT 106) or MAT 096S or satisfactory placement test scores; ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores. Placement tests are used only for initial course placement; see catalog for details.

MAC 114 Dosage Calculations For Health Professionals – 2 credits

Introduces dosage calculations basic information on the apothecary and metric systems, and conversions from one system to another, based on practical drug problems encountered in clinical practice, since it is the responsibility of those administering drugs, to precisely and efficiently carry out medical orders. A review of fractions, decimals, percent’s, ratios, and roman numerals will be included, emphasizing examples used in the most common medication orders.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: MAT 095 or MAT 095S or satisfactory placement test scores.

HUD 114 College Success – 3 credits

Designed to assist incoming students make a successful transition from high school, home, or the workplace to college. Adopts a seminar approach requiring students to use a textbook, listen to lectures, participate in discussions, and complete a variety of written and oral assignments. Adjustment and transition issues-academic, career, and interpersonal-are addressed with a structured, content-based curriculum, flexible enough to promote the exploration and resolution of individual concerns.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None

ESL 114 Spoken English- High Intermediate Level – 3 credits

Expands listening and speaking skills for academic activities such as note-taking during class lectures, summarizing and reporting information taken from the media, debating, taking part in discussions, and interviewing. Individual programs in pronunciation and clear speech are provided as needed. Laboratory is required.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ESL 113 or placement by examination

ENG 114 English Composition II: Literature and Creative Writing – 3 credits

Builds and extends on the academic writing process and skills introduced in English Composition I. Students develop close reading abilities for a variety of literary and nonliterary texts, and hone critical thinking skills, as well as research and documentation skills using a variety of texts that may include essays, fiction, poetry, and drama among other texts. Writing assignments emphasize the formal researched and documented essay and include creative experiments and literary analysis. Course readings include selections from a wide variety of authors, genres and texts that engage students in analysis and research. Students also develop skills in producing as well as understanding literary art. NOTE: Students may receive credit for only ENG 112 or ENG 114 or ENG 116.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 101, 103, or 105

EGR 114 Computational Tools for Engineers and Scientists – 3 credits

An introduction to using computer applications to solve engineering problems. Students learn the rudiments of MATLAB Mathematica and Excel in order to design and/or visualize models of physical systems. Emphasis is on learning to use these applications appropriately and efficiently, with well-structured code that is commented and includes checks to find errors.

(Offered: Every Spring & Summer)Prereq: MAT 108 or concurrent enrollment in MAT 108.

DAN 114 Tap Dance I – 1 to 3 credits

Introduction to the basic tap dance steps and their style of performance, in conjunction with general concepts of dance technique. Students learn traditional tap-step patterns such as time steps and waltz clog, and short combinations. The course presents tap history, including its development as a fusion of African and European dance-music forms through lectures, video viewing, outside-of-class reading and assigned performance attendance. NOTE: Students may earn a total of three credits in DAN 114.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: None

BUS 114 Farm and Food Entrepreneurship – 3 credits

Provides students interested in farm and food systems with an awareness of the business skills necessary to run their businesses successfully. Students examine the social and ethical values common to both successful business operations and sustainable farm systems. This course is for students with interests in farms, restaurants, food production, systems planning, and entrepreneurship.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores.

AGR 114 Creating Farm and Food Co-operatives – 1 credit

Explores cooperative member-owned business models (co-ops) and their various forms of democratic ownership with a focus on the local food economy. Students form groups and receive mentorship in creating their own co-op enterprise with the goals of strengthening food security, sustainability, and/or food access. Interactive workshops and guest speakers inform students’ understanding of the local food economy in the Pioneer Valley.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: None; Recomm: EVS 118

REE 114 Residential Construction Fundamentals – 3 credits

An introduction to residential construction techniques with an emphasis on basic construction skills. Students explore the safe work habits of trades people, construction systems and material handling. Topics include site assessment, material analysis, safe use of power and hand tools, framing, insulation, thermal control practices, and design process overview. Students integrate green, environmentally-responsive practices into each component of the course. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 114 or REE 114, but not for both. Special Requirement: Students must be 18 years of age.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: MAT 090 or MAT 090S, ENG 090, and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S.

MAC 115 Law and Ethics for Health Professionals – 1 credit

An introduction to medical laws that pertain to the practice of medicine within the health care system. Topics include legal responsibilities and the rights of the patient and health care providers, ethical and legal issues faced by healthcare practitioners, and an understanding of the principles of civil law as they relate to the practice of health professionals.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores.

HSV 115 The Helping Relationship – 3 credits

Introduces students to the roles and responsibilities of a helping relationship and the interpersonal skills needed to be an effective helper. The course includes development of self-awareness, the professional helper role, ethical considerations, and cultural competence in the helping profession. The course includes a focus on the theoretical distinctions between various approaches to helping with an eye on implications for practice with varied populations, including people with substance use disorders and other consumers of human services.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores; PSY 101 (or concurrent enrollment in PSY 101); and HSV 101 or HSV 107 (or concurrent enrollment in HSV 101 or HSV 107).

GWS 115 Introduction to Gender and Women’s Studies – 3 credits

Introduction to gender and women’s studies as a basis for understanding human development, social systems, and the historical and biological perspectives that affect people’s lives in the contemporary world.

(Offered: Every Summer)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores.

EGR 115 Civil Engineering Measurement – 3 credits

An introduction to measurements in civil engineering. Topics include basic surveying principles involving linear and angular measurement, leveling, traversing, stadia, and smaller scale measurements, such as displacement and load. Topics also include the use of precision instruments such as verniers, calipers, micrometers and load cells. This course has a lab component.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: MAT 201 Recomm: PHY 111

DAN 115 Tap Dance II – 3 credits

A continuation of the study of tap dance, with increasing complexity and length of patterns. Students focus on clarity of rhythm and tap sounds, and body coordination, while working on style and expression. The course presents tap history, including its development as a fusion of African and European dance-music forms through lectures, video viewing, outside-of-class reading and assigned performance attendance.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: 3 credits of DAN 114, or permission of instructor

AGR 115 Permaculture Landscape Management and Installation – 1 credit

Offers students hands-on permaculture skills for productive landscapes. Students gain applied skills through direct observation of and interaction with permaculture systems, including an edible forest garden, stormwater irrigation system, greenhouse, constructed pond, earth-bermed root cellar, and living roof. This course combines on-site lectures describing landscape management procedures and hands-on installation activities such as mulching, planting, pruning and light-construction. Special Requirement: Field trips. Students assume any travel costs. Students must use gardening hand tools, work in soil for an extended period of time, and traverse sloped landscape.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: None; Recomm: SCI 137

OLP 116 Teambuilding, Group-Development, and Fieldwork – 3 credits

Focuses on principles and methods of program development, risk management, and teaching strategies in the adventure education and recreation field. This course prepares students to plan, organize, conduct, and evaluate supervised outdoor adventure programs utilizing team-building games, activities, and initiatives. Students participate in field trips. Special Requirement: This course involves moderate to high physical activity and the ability to be active and in the outdoors for a full day in a forested environment. All students must submit the OLP Health History and Physical Examination Attestation Form, completed and signed by a physician, verifying medical clearance for full participation. Students assume any travel and permit/pass costs associated with field trips.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores; OLP 111 or concurrent enrollment in OLP 111.

MAT 116 Mathematics for Early Childhood and Elementary Educators – 4 credits

Provides prospective early childhood and elementary teachers with a mathematical foundation designed to support their future work teaching mathematics. Students build on their mathematical understanding, enhance their comprehension of the mathematical/problem solving process, develop their confidence in exploring mathematical concepts, and communicate that understanding to others. Students do college level mathematics in the context of the following topics with particular emphasis on the first one: Number sense and Operations; Geometry and Measurement; and Patterns, Relations and Algebra. Students become conversant with the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Principles and Standards for School Mathematics and with the Massachusetts Department of Education Mathematics Curriculum Frameworks, especially as those documents pertain to the level at which the student intends to teach.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S or satisfactory placement test scores; must be an Early Childhood Education or Liberal Arts/Education Option major or have permission from a full-time math or education faculty person; ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores. Placement tests are used only for initial course placement; see catalog for details.

HFW 116 Principles of Strength Training II – 1 credit

Builds upon HFW 106 Principles of Strength Training I and incorporates weight training and other various exercises to create sound strategies and personal program design practices for improving fitness. NOTE: Students may receive credit for HFW 116 or LED 162 but not for both. Special Requirement: Students participate in movement every class. Specific footwear and clothing requirements will be discussed in the first class session, or students may email the instructor prior to class for further information.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: HFW 108 (LED 157) or HFW 106 (LED 156) or permission of instructor.

ENG 116 English Composition II: Analysis of Literature and Film – 3 credits

Builds and extends on the academic writing process and skills introduced in English Composition I. Students develop close reading abilities for a variety of literary and nonliterary texts, and hone critical thinking skills, as well as research and documentation skills using a variety of genres that may include essays, fiction, poetry, drama, and film. Writing assignments emphasize the formal researched and documented essay and include creative experiments and literary analysis. The course includes selections from a wide variety of authors, genres and texts that engage students in written and visual analysis and research. NOTE: Students may receive credit for only ENG 112 or ENG 114 or ENG 116.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 101, 103, or 105

DAN 116 Middle Eastern Dance I – 3 credits

An introductory course in Middle Eastern Dance. Instruction includes the historical and social context in which the dance is traditionally performed as a form of social dance, entertainment, and cultural expression, as well as general concepts of dance technique and practice. Students learn a variety of styles of Middle Eastern dance including oriental, baladi, shaabi, tribal, and fusion, and folk dances such as the Lebanese debke. Students become familiar with the rhythms of Middle Eastern music, such as maqsum, ayub, masmoudi, chiftitelli and Turkish 9/8. Students explore the use of props, for example: veils, fan veils, and finger cymbals. Video viewing and outside of class reading and writing assignments, or performance attendance augment in class practice.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None

BUS 116 E-Commerce – 3 credits

For students interested in entrepreneurship, marketing, computer information systems, or web design and development careers. This course is an exploration of the business, marketing, technical, and legal considerations of conducting business via the Internet. Students investigate business-to-business and business-to-consumer models; identify necessary computer technologies and needed skill sets; examine user interface objectives and architectural implications; review methods for branding, communicating and persuading via Internet marketing channels; examine website and database management requirements; explore using data for website analytics and search engine optimization; and identify legal considerations.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), MAT 090 or MAT 090S, or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: Competency in word processing and spreadsheet operation.

AGR 116 Wild Foods – 1 credit

A basic introduction to observing, identifying, harvesting and preserving native plants, herbs and weeds for edible and nutritional purposes. Topics also include how common weeds, including invasive species, can be turned in to value-added products–improving the productivity of farms, gardens or homesteads. Special Requirement: Field trips; students assume any travel costs and make arrangements for their own transportation. Students must traverse uneven landscapes.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: None Recomm: SCI 137; BIO 102

REE 116 Introduction to Geothermal Heating & Cooling – 1 credit

An introduction to geothermal heating and cooling with particular emphasis on ground source heat exchange systems. Topics include geothermal basics, ground loop selection and design, building evaluation and equipment sizing, performance monitoring and verification. Site visits to geothermal system installations reinforce classroom learning. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 116 or REE 116, but not for both. Special Requirement: Field trips required.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S, ENG 090, and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores.

MAT 117 Mathematical Problem Solving – 3 credits

Provides students in the liberal arts with a foundation to mathematical reasoning and quantitative skills in decision making processes. Students focus on ideas rather than techniques as they implement problem solving strategies. The course introduces students to topics that might include, but are not limited to mathematical modeling, graph theory, the mathematics of social choice, growth and symmetry, descriptive statistics, and probability.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: MAT 095 (105) or MAT 095S or satisfactory placement test scores; ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores. Placement tests are used only for initial course placement; see catalog for details.

ESL 117 English Sounds and Spelling – 3 credits

Provides practice for non-native speakers in American English pronunciation as it relates to basic patterns of spelling. Techniques from phonetics and phonics help students master “exceptions” or words with irregular spelling and/or pronunciation. Students apply understanding of sounds, rhythm, intonation, spelling of syllables, and spelling rules in creative practice for people with diverse learning styles.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ESL 112 or permission of instructor

DAN 117 Middle Eastern Dance II – 3 credits

A continuation of the study of the movements, steps and style of Middle Eastern Dance. Students refine their ability to perform traditional movements with emphasis on personal expression, correct performance style and dynamics, the ability to respond appropriately to various tempos, rhythms and meters. Students learn choreographed dances and explore improvisation. Video viewing and outside of class reading and writing assignments, or performance attendance augment in class practice.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: DAN 116, or permission of instructor

AGR 117 Greenhouse Production and Management – 4 credits

An introductory course on the fundamental principles of organic greenhouse management. Students investigate and implement emerging best practices in high-tech greenhouse environments and assist with managing plant production in the on-campus greenhouse. Topics include mechanical systems required for heating and cooling; soil media and organic fertilizers; cultural practices that support plant health; insect and disease management; propagation techniques; automated controls; and integrated greenhouse management planning. Field trips to local greenhouse sites examine diverse options in management practices, production scale, and career opportunities. NOTE: This course does not fulfill the Natural or Physical Science requirement. Special Requirement: Field trips. Students assume any travel costs.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: MAT 090 or MAT 090S, ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: BIO 102 or BIO 124; MAT 095 or MAT 095S.

SCI 117 Meteorology – 4 credits

An introductory course in meteorology, which is a study of how the atmosphere interacts with solar energy to create dynamic weather systems. The student applies basic meteorological and climatological principles to the study of local and regional weather patterns. Students do a portion of their work in the computer lab.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090), and MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores

THE 117 Experimental Performance – 3 credits

Explores alternatives to the traditional modes of performance and the development of short performances that may combine theater with studio art, music, sculpture, movement, dance, other academic fields, and site specific events. Students create original performances rooted in their own experiences and interest.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores Recomm: THE 101

HFW 118 Personal Fitness Training II – 1 credit

An intermediate level course to build on skillsets and concepts regarding creation and maintenance of healthy lifestyle habits. The course introduces the intermediate level progression of dynamic strength and conditioning movement and recording practices for exercise and nutrition. Special Requirement: Students participate in movement every class. Workout style clothing that promotes freedom of movement is highly recommended. Students may email the instructor prior to class for further information.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: HFW 106 (LED 156) or HFW 108 (LED 157)

EVS 118 Introduction to Food Systems – 3 credits

An introduction to the current state of the global food system and its implications for people, the environment, and our future. Topics include the benefits and drawbacks of the industrial agricultural model; food justice, food security and public health; the real-life challenges to creating a local food system; and innovative responses to meet those challenges. Students undertake research projects that follow food study models and assess the capacity of a municipality to develop a local food system. Special Requirement: Field trips required.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores.

ESL 118 Advanced ESOL Grammar – 3 credits

Advanced topics in English grammar for bilingual students. Topics include verb tenses for narration; adjectives and prepositional phrases for description; active and passive voice; agreement and sentence combining; sentence transitions; time expressions; articles; and vocabulary. Students contrast U.S. styles of writing and class participation with writing and class participation styles in other countries.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ESL 104, or ESL 108, or permission of instructor

AGR 118 Sustainable Farming Skills – 3 credits

An introduction to modern sustainable farming methods and practices: apply sustainable farming skills and methods to crop production in a whole-farm system, including plant, animal, and market considerations; work safely around crops, machinery, and other constraints. Topics include land-use planning and crop lay out, nutrient use and recycling, planting, maintenance and harvesting, and harvesting for sustainable agricultural systems. Class structure includes lecture, demonstration, reading and written assignments, and on-farm participation. Hands-on experience provides practical skills and complements theory. NOTE: Livestock present, but student interaction not expected. Special Requirement: Must possess physical ability to use hand tools. Must wear hard-soled, closed-toe work shoes or boots, minimum of ankle high. Students work with farm equipment. Travel to off-campus site required. Students assume travel costs.

(Offered: Every Summer)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores; MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores.

REE 118 Greenhouse Gas Assessment and Carbon Cap and Trade – 1 credit

An introduction to the policy and technical issues of greenhouse gas assessment and reporting, and carbon cap and trade mechanisms. Students learn about existing European cap and trade models; the issues associated with instituting a cap and trade program in the US; how to assess greenhouse emissions for registration and trading purposes; and the evolving carbon trading markets. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 118 or REE 118, but not for both.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S, ENG 090, and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores.

ESL 119 English at Work – 3 credits

Introduces English language and cultural patterns to students who are working or seeking work in the American workplace. Topics include basic English vocabulary for employment, basic mathematical operations in English, interacting with co-workers and supervisors, using electronic communications, resume writing, labor laws in the U.S. and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and cultural expectations on the job.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: For students whose native language is not English. Intermediate level of English proficiency determined by ESOL placement examination. Contact ESOL Program Coordinator. Recomm: Concurrent enrollment in ESL 110 or CIS 110 or basic proficiency in computer skills.

OLP 120 Wilderness Medical Preparedness and Rescue – 2 credits

Develops student knowledge in wilderness rescue and medical emergency preparedness through field simulations for land-based activities. Students participate in weekly day-long field trips. Special Requirement: This course involves moderate to high physical activity and the ability to be active and in the outdoors for a full day in a remote, forested environment. Off-campus field trips. All students must submit the OLP Health History and Physical Examination Attestation Form, completed and signed by a physician, verifying medical clearance for full participation. Students assume any travel and permit/pass costs associated with field trips.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

MAC 120 Medical Claims Management – 3 credits

An introduction to medical insurance billing, credit and collection procedures, as well as the various insurance options and the laws governing the payers/insurers. Additional topics include preparing and reviewing claims forms, the significance of coding, electronic and computerized billing, and fraud and abuse, as well as other pertinent topics. NOTE: Students my receive credit for MAC 120 or MOM 210, but not for both.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: MOM 110 or concurrent enrollment in MOM 110 or permission of Instructor.

DAN 120 World Dance and Culture – 3 credits

A global tour of dance as a universal element of human culture. Students learn how dance functions within different societies as celebration, religion and ritual, socialization and courtship, cultural/national identity and political strategy, and art and entertainment. Students examine selected dance forms from Africa, the Caribbean and Brazil, Asia, Europe and the United States, and Native American culture through outside reading, DVD/video viewing, and in-class discussion. This is a non-performance course.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

BIO 120 Introduction to Environmental Science – 4 credits

Provides an overview of the principles of environmental sciences with the overall objective of increasing student awareness and understanding of regional, national, and global environmental issues. Students focus on environmental problems, ecological principles, human population, natural resources, environmental quality, pollution, biodiversity, and conservation.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores.

SCI 120 Sustainable Energy: Theory and Practice – 4 credits

Explores the theoretical and practical aspects of renewable and nonrenewable energy sources with an emphasis on sustainable energy use and efficiency. Students investigate fundamental scientific concepts–in biology, chemistry and physics–that underpin energy efficiency and renewable energy (RE/EE) strategies and technologies, and provide a foundation for further technical study in the college certificate and degree programs. Topics include conventional and alternative power generation, solar (thermal and electric), wind, transportation, green building and building efficiency, climate change, bioenergy, sustainable agriculture and others. Field trips and labs provide hands-on experience working with a variety of energy technology models. Students explore potential career and educational pathways in the field. Special Requirement: Field trips required.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S, or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: MAT 096 (MAT 106) or MAT 096S strongly recommended.

MOM 121 Medical Coding: Diagnosis – 3 credits

An introduction to analyzing and classifying medical documents for reporting medical diagnostics, services and procedures by physicians according to current International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) professional standards. The course introduces students to specificity, completeness, accuracy of coding procedures and techniques, and cross-referencing to ICD-9 coding system elements as necessary. The course requires significant case study lab practice.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: MOM 110 or Concurrent enrollment in MOM 110

EVS 121 Gender and the Environment – 3 credits

Examination of historical and present day roles of women and men in relation to their environment. The course surveys how gender roles have affected survival in hunter gatherer and agrarian societies, earth-centered practices in religion and medicine, and the growth and influence of industrialism and nationalism. The course focuses on understanding gender-linked relationships between population, poverty, and environmental degradation and the importance of new cooperative models for converting to an ecologically sustainable society utilizing case studies and role models. NOTE: Students may receive credit for HEC 121 or EVS 121, but not for both.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

EDU 121 Reading and Language for the Young Child – 3 credits

Emphasizes the importance of effective communication and implements the belief that skills, abilities, and attitudes needed for such communication are identifiable and teachable. The integration of all the language arts into a curriculum for young children is stressed.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

DAN 121 Dance History – 3 credits

Survey course of the major events in the history of western theatrical dance. Topics covered include: Renaissance court dance, Baroque dance, Romantic, Classical, and Neo-Classical Ballet; Diaghilev’s Les Ballets Russes; the emergence of modern dance in the 20th century; Black dance. Selected figures of dance history discussed, such as Louis XIV, Marie Taglioni, Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, Katherine Dunham, George Balanchine. Class format includes lecture, outside reading and in-class video and film viewing.

(Offered: Every Other Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

CRJ 121 Criminology – 3 credits

Examines various aspects of crime, criminals, criminal behavior, and society’s response to all three. The course looks at behavior from a sociological perspective. Other topics include the history of criminological thought and crime causation; the nature and extent of crime, criminal typologies; victimization; and whether status such as class, poverty, race, and gender help to explain deviant or normative behavior in our society.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores; Recomm: CRJ 101 and CRJ 103

ART 121 Visual Concepts I – 3 credits

Introduces the visual language of art-making and the principles of design. The course emphasizes problem-solving through the investigation of composition, spatial issues, the perceptual use of color and the development of visual ideas in 2D, 3D, and time.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 094 (COL 090) or concurrent enrollment or satisfactory placement test score; Recomm: ENG 090 or satisfactory placement test score

ACC 121 Principles of Financial Accounting I – 4 credits

An introduction to accounting concepts and principles used by modern businesses. The course concentrates on the recording of various business transactions in a manual accounting system. Topics include: the framework of accounting, the preparation of financial statements, transaction analysis for both service and merchandising operations, accounting information services, internal controls, and accounting for cash.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), and MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores

REE 121 Introduction to Photovoltaic (Solar Electric) Technology – 3 credits

An introduction to photovoltaic (solar electric) technology for students with a strong personal interest in photovoltaics (PV) as well as those considering a career in solar electric technology. This course provides students with the theoretical basis for understanding the various types of solar electric systems. The course covers the history of solar electricity, current markets and industry status, basic electrical theory, and other considerations necessary for solar electric systems. Topics include a detailed study of system components as well as the proper and safe electrical interconnection of these components and includes hands-on training exercises and experiments. Local visits to PV related facilities and assembly of real world systems examples reinforce classroom learning. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 121 or REE 121, but not for both. Special Requirement: Field trips required.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S, ENG 090, and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: EGT 112 (SCI 112)

MOM 122 Medical Coding: Procedures – 3 credits

Introduces the methodology and guidelines for medical coding for evaluation and management services, anesthesia, surgery, radiology, laboratory, medicine and the use of modifiers. Students analyze and classify medical documents for reporting medical procedures and services by providers according to Current Procedural Terminology Standards. The course requires significant case study lab practice.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: MOM 110 or Concurrent enrollment in MOM 110

HUD 122 Practicum in Governance – 1 credit

An opportunity for students to participate in group problem solving and decision making within the context of Greenfield Community College’s governance structure. This practicum introduces the student to several skills including organizing and conducting a meeting, communicating within a group, understanding the roles of group members, handling conflict, and presenting group decisions to outside constituents. NOTE: Students receive one credit per semester upon successful completion of the course. Students may repeat this course two times, for a maximum total of three credits. GCC waives tuition and fees for this course.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: Must be currently enrolled in GCC, must have completed one academic semester at GCC, and must be appointed in the manner required by the GCC Assembly Bylaws.

EVS 122 Understanding Climate Change: Policy and Practice – 3 credits

An examination of climate change and energy policy from social, political and practical perspectives. Students explore social aspects of climate change from individual behavior to global governance. Students study and compare solutions put in place by governments, communities, and institutions. Students participate in civic opportunities with a goal of empowered and discerning decision-making. Students gain familiarity with the fundamental concepts of climate policy and the key factors and decisions that impact human society and the climate system. Special Requirement: Attend a civic meeting. Students assume any travel costs.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: MAT 095 or MAT 095S, ENG 090

BIO 122 Freshwater Ecology – 4 credits

Provides an overview of the ecology of freshwater habitats and freshwater organisms. The course emphasizes the study of wetlands (marshes, bogs, swamps and vernal ponds), streams, rivers, ponds, lakes and the biological communities (including plants, insects, fish, reptiles and amphibians) that they support. Students utilize fish-stocked recirculating tanks to conduct experiments and study the science of aquaculture (aquatic plant and animal farming). Students study the composition and conditions of freshwater habitats and go on field trips to different freshwater sites.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

ACC 122 Principles of Financial Accounting II – 4 credits

A continuation of ACC 121. Topics include: accounts and notes receivable, inventory management, property and equipment transactions and the related depreciation, intangible assets, long-term liabilities, payroll accounting, and accounting for partnership and corporate activities.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ACC 121

REE 122 Solar Domestic Hot Water – 1 credit

An examination of solar hot water systems for heating water for residences. Topics include the environmental benefits and economics of solar hot water systems, siting and sizing systems, choosing appropriate equipment, descriptions of all components as well as their assembly and function. Students assemble a solar system to heat water. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 122 or REE 122, but not for both. Special Requirement: Field trips required.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S, ENG 090, and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores.

ESL 123 Reading and Vocabulary-Intermediate Level – 3 credits

Focuses on reading comprehension, vocabulary development, book reports, note-taking and test-taking strategies for intermediate-level ESL students. Students read fiction, non-fiction, newspapers, and a wide range of subjects to provide a foundation for success in college and the workplace. Laboratory is required.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: Placement by examination

EGT 123 Introduction to Material Science: Metals – 2 credits

A study of the fundamental characteristics of engineering metals. Topics include a thorough analysis of the response of crystalline materials to mechanical stress and thermal treatment and the selection of materials for mechanical properties. The course emphasis is on the relationship between microstructure and mechanical behavior of materials.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores; MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores.

EDU 123 Infant and Toddler Care – 3 credits

Provides an overview of developmentally appropriate practices that support the optimal growth of child birth to two years and nine months. Topics include the importance of relationship-based and culturally sensitive practices, self reflection, and the importance of using observation and assessment to plan nurturing, responsive and stimulating activities for infants and toddlers. Students must complete 2 hours of field observation in an early education and care program approved by the program coordinator. Students provide their own transportation.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores Recomm: PSY 101 or SOC 101 or PSY 233 or EDU 101

ART 123 Visual Concepts II – 3 credits

Continues to develop proficiency in visual problem-solving through the investigation of composition, spatial issues, the perceptual use of color and the development of visual ideas in 2D, 3D, and time. Students produce a portfolio of work that demonstrates a critical understanding of the principles of design.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ART 121

REE 123 Passive Solar Technology – 1 credit

An examination of the history, science and implementation of passive solar technologies to offset heating, hot water and lighting needs for a house and commercial/industrial buildings. Topics include fundamental principles such as structure orientation, proper glazing materials and installation, use of thermal mass, adequate ventilation, landscape features for cooling, and others. Students see and visit real world applications of these technologies. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 123 or REE 123, but not for both. Special Requirement: Field trips required.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S, ENG 090, and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores.

ESL 124 Reading and Vocabulary-High Intermediate – 3 credits

An intensive study of reading processes, college-level material including literature, and many kinds of college tests. Students learn techniques for independent vocabulary acquisition and effective writing about reading material in book reports and other writing assignments. Laboratory is required.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ESL 123 or placement by examination

EGR 124 Introduction to Digital and Computer Systems – 4 credits

The theory of digital circuits and computer systems, stressing general techniques for the analysis and synthesis of combinational and sequential logic systems.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: MAT 107 or satisfactory placement test score into MA T 108 or concurrent enrollment in MAT 107. ENG 090 and ENG 094 or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: PHY 112 or concurrent enrollment in PHY 112

BIO 124 Introductory Horticulture – 4 credits

Provides knowledge on how to propagate and care for plants through experiences with soils, seeds, bulbs, potting, watering, pruning, dividing, terrariums, and fertilizers. Students learn how to design and manage a vegetable garden for maximum harvest. The laboratory sessions provide experiences with plants, such as mixing soil, planting seeds, taking cuttings, potting up plants, fertilizing plants, plant growth, constructing terrariums, and a trip to a local plant growing business. NOTE: Students may receive credit for BIO 111 or BIO 124, but not for both.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

REE 124 Energy Conservation and Efficiency – 1 credit

An exploration of the methods and equipment to improve the energy efficiency of existing and new structures. These energy uses include heating/cooling loads and electrical consumption. Students learn how to use existing technology to assess energy usage, evaluate opportunities for reducing and managing loads, and learn best current practices. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 124 or REE 124, but not for both.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test score.

SPA 124 Spanish for Health Professionals – 4 credits

Emphasizes the fundamentals of Spanish both for students seeking positions in health related fields and those already working in the professions. The course focuses on “survival” Spanish language skills and cross-cultural training for health professionals. Students develop their command of Spanish in specific job related areas. The course prepares participants for those aspects of Hispanic/Latino cultures that have an impact on their work. Much of the class is spent working in pairs and small groups role-playing situations that participants will encounter on the job.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: None

MUS 125 Jazz Ensemble – 2 credits

Allows students to rehearse and perform in a variety of jazz styles including “Blues,” “Swing,” “Bebop,” and “Latin.” The course stresses improvisational skills as well as ensemble expertise. Two informal presentations and a final “Gala” concert conclude the course.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: Permission of instructor

REE 125 Sustainable Landscape Design – 3 credits

An exploration into the fundamentals of landscape design with particular attention to integrating both existing and new buildings sustainably into their landscapes. Students investigate sustainable design strategies that address the ecological, water, energy and food system links between buildings and their supporting sites, as exemplified by the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) rating system. Topics include geology, hydrology, soils, vegetation, design principles, green roofs, green walls, rainwater collection systems, native planting, edible landscapes, and the human dimension of landscape architecture. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 125 or REE 125, but not for both. Special Requirement: Field trips required.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: MAT 090 or MAT 090S, ENG 090, and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores.

BIO 126 Biology I – 4 credits

An introduction to cellular and molecular biology. Major topics include the biochemical basis of life, cell biology, photosynthesis, respiration, mitosis, meiosis, genetics, DNA structure and replication and protein synthesis. Students engage the scientific method by designing, conducting, and evaluating laboratory experiences that include selected topics in cell structure and function, enzymes, respiration, photosynthesis, genetics and molecular biology. NOTE: Students may receive credit for BIO 119 or BIO 126, but not for both.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090), and a grade of C or better in MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S, or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: MAT 096 or MAT 096S strongly recommended.

REE 126 Residential Energy Efficiency and Energy Auditing – 3 credits

An exploration of the methods and the skills required to perform energy audits of residential buildings. Topics include methods of energy conservation; elements and steps of energy auditing; insulation of walls, foundation and attic; door and window infiltration reduction; lighting and electrical efficiency; heating system analysis and efficiency; hot water system analysis and efficiency; energy monitoring and measuring equipment; energy audit reporting; and sustainable energy systems. Students perform a residential energy audit. Successful completion of REE 126 (SCI 126) prepares students to take the Building Performance Institute (BPI) Building Analyst I written exam. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 126 or REE 126, but not for both. Special Requirement: Field trips required.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S, ENG 090, and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: Concurrent enrollment in REE 136 (SCI 136) (Applied Residential Energy Auditing) is recommended for those desiring a hands on component to energy auditing.

MUS 127 20th Century American Popular Music – 3 credits

A cultural overview of popular music in 20th century American society with emphasis on rock, folk, pop, and world fusion styles. The course examines how music technology, commercialism, and cultural diversity have influenced the development of musical styles and practices unique to American life.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

HIS 127 History of African-American Peoples – 3 credits

A survey of the African-American experience in the United States, including African heritage, enslavement and slavery, resistance, the Civil War and Reconstruction and their combined legacies of racism and oppression, and the continuing struggles of African-Americans for full and equal rights.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

BIO 127 Biology II – 4 credits

An introduction to organismal biology with a focus on evolution, the diversity of life and ecology. Major topics include the processes and outcomes of microevolution, macroevolution and the history of life, a survey of the major groups of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, basic plant and animal structures and their functions, and ecology. Students engage the scientific method by designing, conducting and evaluating laboratory experiences that include selected topics in evolution, organismal diversity, and ecology. Field-based lab experiences train students to observe, identify, collect, measure and monitor organisms in the wild. Special Requirement: Field trips. Students assume any travel costs.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: BIO 126 or BIO 102; MAT 095 or MAT 095S. Recomm: ENG 101 and MAT 096 or MAT 096S strongly recommended.

REE 127 Introduction to Sustainable Design and Green Building – 3 credits

An introduction to sustainable design and Green building. Topics include the study of energy issues related to buildings. Additional topics include residential building site analysis and design; air, heat and moisture flow; Green building materials; climate and designing with nature; energy conservation and efficiency; sustainable energy systems; and on-site power generation. Students visit Green buildings to reinforce classroom learning. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 127 or REE 127, but not for both. Special Requirement: Field trips required.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S, ENG 090, and ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores.

HUD 128 College Strategies – 1 credit

Introduces students to the academic and co-curricular components of college. Topics include college services and resources, academic strategies and study skills, self-assessment, time management, goal-setting, and short- and long-term planning. Students learn about GCC’s general education abilities and draw connections between these outcomes and areas of their own learning.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None

HFW 128 Personal Fitness Training III – 1 credit

An advanced level course to further the progression of learning in the promotion of healthy lifestyle habits. The course builds on HFW 108 (LED 157) and HFW 118. Special Requirement: Students participate in movement every class. Workout style clothing that promotes freedom of movement is highly recommended. Students may email the instructor prior to class for further information.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: HFW 108 (LED 157), HFW 118

REE 128 Solar Thermal Systems – 3 credits

An examination of solar water heating for domestic hot water, house heating, swimming pool heating, process heating and electrical generation. Topics include system economics, environmental benefits, siting and sizing of systems, types of systems, equipment installation, operation and maintenance. Students assemble and operate a domestic solar hot water system. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 128 or REE 128, but not for both. Special Requirement: Field trips required.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S, ENG 090, and ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores.

HUD 129 Learning Studio for Dual Enrollment – 0 credits

Supports the success of Dual Enrollment students through student-faculty interaction, peer study groups, and academic and career guidance. NOTE: Students may repeat this course without limit.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: Open to Dual Enrollment Students only.

ECO 129 Global Economics – 3 credits

Study of international trade, international finance, and developmental economics. Topics include trade models, population, poverty, income distribution, international investment, currency exchange, trade agreements, global sustainability, and the roles and effects of global institutions.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090) and MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S or satisfactory placement test scores

REE 129 Fundamentals of Wind Energy – 3 credits

An introduction to the practice and theory of wind electric generation. Topics include homeowner, small/business, utility, interior, offshore, grid tied and off grid wind systems; mechanical and electrical components; economic viability; environmental, aesthetic and safety concerns; and laws and permits. Students participate in the site visits and meet with wind energy experts. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 129 or REE 129, but not for both. Special Requirement: Field trips required.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S, ENG 090, and ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: EGT 112 (SCI 112)

MUS 130 Applied Music – 1 credit

Individual music lessons open to all students of any level or interest. Individual lessons meet for one-half hour per week for 12 weeks. Additional group instruction meetings happen twice during the semester at times to be determined by instructor. Students and instructors arrange regular meeting times on an individual basis. NOTE: There is a charge for a studio instructor fee in addition to tuition. Students may repeat this course without limit but may enroll in not more than one section in a single semester. See college course catalog for details.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None

HUD 130 General Education Seminar: Introduction to Information Literacy – 1 credit

An introduction to information literacy and research skills enabling students to locate, evaluate, and use information. Topics include the organization of information, the use of structured inquiry to conduct efficient discipline-based search strategies, the evaluation of information for authority and content, and the ethical use of information within the context of a literature review.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 094 or satisfactory placement test score or concurrent enrollment in ENG 094.

BIO Human Nutrition Lab – 1 credit

A laboratory supplement to BIO 130. This course introduces students to various biological and chemical aspects of nutrition using laboratory experiments designed to highlight specific nutrients and properties of foods. Students learn laboratory procedures and common techniques used by food scientists and chemists in the field of nutrition and food science. NOTE: This course satisfies the four-credit laboratory science requirement only when combined with a successful completion of BIO 130.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090), and MAT 090 or MAT 090S, or satisfactory placement test scores and BIO 130 concurrently or satisfactory completion.

BIO 130 Human Nutrition – 3 credits

The study of nutrition and its application to good health and a sense of well being. Topics include the applications of nutrition to physical fitness, preventive medicine, and health care. NOTE: This course satisfies the four-credit laboratory science requirement only when combined with a successful completion of BIO 130L.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

REE 130 Extreme Insulation Retrofits – 3 credits

An examination of the science and techniques of super insulating existing homes to significantly reduce heating energy requirements in an environmentally sound manner. Topics include building construction as it relates to insulation, current problems in insulation envelopes, heat loss in buildings, insulation priorities, insulation material characteristics, costs, construction strategies for insulating basements, walls and roofs, and demonstrations of insulation materials. Students participate in site visits. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 130 or REE 130, but not for both. Special Requirement: Field trips required.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S, ENG 090, and ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: REE 126 (SCI 126)

HIS 131 Women in American History – 3 credits

A survey of women’s roles in American history emphasizing the social history of unknown as well as famous women of diverse ethnic and class backgrounds who helped shape life and culture in America from the Colonial period through the Revolutionary era, the Frontier movement, 19th Century political activism and urbanization, and the 20th century through reform movements and the global community.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

DAN 131 Basic Ballet – 1 credit

An introduction to basic level ballet vocabulary, technique, and movement patterns that increase in length and difficulty over time. Classes include dance practice and dance history. Students learn a stretch and movement warm-up, traveling steps, and a challenging center combination. Students learn the history and cultural significance of ballet. Students develop proper body alignment and core strength through practice and repetition. Students use safe and intelligent movement. The course encourages individual freedom of expression through the art of dance. Special Requirement: Students should wear comfortable exercise clothing to class. Dance/yoga pants, tank tops, t-shirts, leotards, tights, and sweat pants are all acceptable. Students may choose to dance in bare feet, socks, or ballet shoes.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: None

CRJ 131 Social Issues in Criminal Justice – 3 credits

Increases personal and professional awareness of contemporary social issues in criminal justice. This course allows students to view influences such as race, class, gender and the distribution of wealth and power through the prism of the legal system. Topics may include abortion, domestic violence, racial profiling, hate crimes, the death penalty and white collar crime.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: Any ONE of the following: CRJ 101, CRJ 103, POL 101 SOC 101, SOC 201, HIS 105, or HIS 106

ART 131 Drawing Foundation – 3 credits

Presents a series of problems to acquaint the student with perceptual and inventive skills in drawing. The course introduces the visual language, drawing materials, and techniques while examining ways of implying space on a two-dimensional surface.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 094 (COL 090) or concurrent enrollment or satisfactory placement test score; Recomm: ENG 090 or satisfactory placement test score

REE 131 Introduction to Piping – 2 credits

An introduction to piping and materials used to install various piping systems, with an emphasis on solar thermal energy applications. Topics include analysis and characteristics of the most commonly used piping system materials – copper, steel and polyvinylchloride (PVC); best methods to join these materials; and calculation and proper assemblage of basic piping projects. NOTE: Course is taught at an off campus location. Students may receive credit for SCI 131 or REE 131, but not for both. Special Requirement: Must possess physical ability to use power tools.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090), and MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores.

DAN 132 Basic Hip Hop – 1 credit

An introduction to hip hop dance. Students learn hip hop dance terminology and practice fundamental hip hop dance movements. Classes include a full body warm-up, specific dance exercises, improvisational exercises, and dance combinations that increase in difficulty over time. Class activities encourage self expression and increase strength, flexibility, coordination, rhythmic awareness, and musicality. This course introduces dance technique while also examining the history and cultural significance of hip hop dance. Special Requirement: Appropriate clothing and footwear is required. Students should wear comfortable exercise clothing to class. Dance/yoga pants, tank tops, t-shirts, leotards, tights, and sweat pants are all acceptable. Students must wear clean, non-streak athletic sneakers.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: None

BIO 132 Lifestyle, Health, and Medicine – 4 credits

An investigation into the impact of lifestyle on the human body with an emphasis on the treatment of lifestyle related disease. Topics include an overview of physiology, metabolism, stress, nutrition, and exercise. Topics relate to the treatment of obesity, heart disease, hypertension and type II diabetes. Students apply class knowledge to emerging trends in the business of medicine.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores; MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S or satisfactory placement test score or permission of instructor.

ART 132 Drawing II – 3 credits

A continuation of Drawing Foundation with emphasis on personal expression, idea development, and the use of color. Students work through a series of problems leading to the development of a drawing portfolio.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ART 121 and ART 131

REE 132 Introduction to Home Heating and Cooling – 3 credits

An overview of the basic principles behind heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC). Topics include heat transfer, refrigeration cycles; differentiation of system types, and the new tools needed for emerging HVAC technologies. Students explore equipment hands-on, to include hydronic and air systems, heat recovery ventilators (HRVs), geothermal heat pumps, filters, and humidifiers. This course is ideal for students wishing to work with solar hot water systems or do energy audits, for real estate agents and home inspectors updating their knowledge of modern HVAC options, and for current or future homeowners seeking the best combination of efficiency and comfort. NOTE: Course is taught at an off-campus location. Students may receive credit for SCI 132 or REE 132, but not for both. Special Requirement: Must possess physical ability to use power tools.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090), and MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores.

HIS 133 World History I – 3 credits

An exploration of the origins of humankind and the development of ancient and Medieval societies across the world (India, China, Africa, the Americas, Australia, Europe, and the Middle East).

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 101 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 101

EDU 133 Day Care Administration – 3 credits

Explores the intricacies of managing a center for young children. Topics include the children, the curriculum, the environment, personnel management and development, budget and funding, legal concerns, state and local regulations and working with the parents and the community to provide a sound program for young children.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: EDU 201; Recomm: Office of Child Care Services (OCCS) Lead Teacher Qualified

DAN 133 Basic Modern Dance – 1 credit

An introduction to basic level modern dance vocabulary, technique, and movement patterns that increase in length and difficulty over time. Classes include dance practice and dance history. Students learn a stretch and movement warm-up, traveling steps, and a challenging center combination. Students learn the history and cultural significance of modern dance. Students develop proper body alignment and core strength through practice and repetition. Students use safe and intelligent movement. The course encourages individual freedom of expression through the art of dance. Special Requirement: Appropriate clothing is required. Students should wear comfortable exercise clothing to class. Dance/yoga pants, tank tops, t-shirts, leotards, tights, and sweat pants are all acceptable. Socks or bare feet are preferable.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: None

REE 133 Introduction to Architectural Modeling – 2 credits

An introduction to architectural modeling utilizing computer software and hand tools. The course introduces computer assisted drawing basics such as working with pens, layers, fills, textures, and objects before moving into more advanced topics including building modeling; presentation rendering; animation creation, and drawing layout. Students create a 3-D model of a building and generate simple architectural plans, elevations, rendered perspectives, and even “fly through” animations. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 133 or REE 133, but not for both. Special Requirement: Students should have a basic knowledge of how to operate a computer.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090), and MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores.

SPA 133 Spanish for Law Enforcement – 4 credits

Emphasizes the fundamentals of Spanish both for students seeking positions in law enforcement and those already working in the profession. The course focuses on “survival” Spanish language skills and cross-cultural training for law enforcement professionals. Students develop their command of Spanish in specific job related areas. The course prepares participants for those aspects of Hispanic/Latino cultures that have impact on their work. Students spend much of the class working in pairs and small groups role-playing situations that participants encounter on the job.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: None

THE 133 College Theater Workshop – 1 credit

Practical experience in acting, house management, public relations, publicity, shop, and production crews for the current GCC production- or instructor-approved, off-campus production. NOTE: Students may repeat this course three times for a maximum of 4 credits. No more than one credit may be earned in any given semester.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

HIS 134 World History II – 3 credits

An exploration of the increasingly interconnected modern world, from the period of European colonialism after Columbus, to the growth of globalization after World War II.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 101 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 101

REE 134 Building with Earth, Straw, Wood, and Stone – 3 credits

Explores aspects of building with minimally-processed, locally available, plentiful, natural and recycled building materials with an emphasis on residential construction. Students learn techniques for working with straw bale, cordwood masonry, cob, “Earthship” rammed-earth tires, light straw, earth plasters, etc. through research, projects, hands-on activities and field trips. Students examine natural building materials impact on energy efficiency and the environment. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 134 or REE 134, but not for both. Special Requirement: Use of power and hand tools.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090), and MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: REE 114 (SCI 114), REE 127 (SCI 127).

HUD 135 Career Exploration and Planning – 1 credit

Introduces students to the career exploration and planning process. Students use online tools and supplemental resources to complete self-assessments, engage in self-reflection, gather information about careers of interest, and relate potential careers to educational opportunities. Through this class students create an action plan for achieving their education and career goals.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 or satisfactory placement scores

REE 135 Green Careers Exploration & Career Skill Building – 3 credits

Explores the diverse array of expanding green career opportunities and the impact of sustainability on existing occupations and industries. Students engage local community members, organizations and employers. Students develop important work-finding skills such as resume creation, interviewing and networking. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 135 or REE 135, but not for both. Special Requirement: Field trips required.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: CIS 140 or competency in word processing & spreadsheets.

REE 136 Applied Residential Energy Auditing – 1 credit

A hands-on use of equipment for conducting a residential home energy efficiency audit. Students perform an inspection and evaluation of the exterior and interior of an actual structure; operate a blower door and measure air leakage; evaluate air sealing and insulation; test heating systems, stoves and water heaters. Successful completion of REE 136 (SCI 136) prepares students to take the Building Performance Institute (BPI) Building Analyst I Field Exam. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 136 or REE 136, but not for both. Special Requirement: Must possess physical ability to use power tools. Must be able to handle test equipment weighing up to 20 pounds. Must be able to climb short ladders and be capable of wearing a respirator and a dust mask.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S, ENG 090, and ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores; REE 126 (SCI 126) or concurrent enrollment.

MUS 137 World Music and Cultures – 3 credits

A survey of music and culture including Native North America, Latin America, Black America, West and South Africa, the Mideast, India, Japan, and Eastern Europe. The course emphasizes strategies for understanding and listening to all kinds of music. Students do local cultural fieldwork projects and have the opportunity to produce field recordings as part of their final research project.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

SCI 137 Permaculture Design – 4 credits

An introduction to permaculture: a practice of designing systems, modeled from ecological relationships, that respects the land while serving its inhabitants. Topics include permaculture theory, innovative techniques, systems-thinking, and site assessment and analysis. (e.g. patterns of sun/shade, drainage, vegetation). Lab components include hands-on learning and technical skills through field work on campus, field trips, and design studio. Students apply these skills to a real design project and recommend appropriate permaculture applications such as perennial food production, soil regeneration, and integrated water management. NOTE: students who successfully complete a minimum of 72 class hours and the final design project will receive a Permaculture Design Certificate. Special Requirement: Field trips. Students assume any travel costs. Students must use garden hand tools and work in the soil of permaculture gardens.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090), and MAT 090 or MAT 090S, or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: REE 125 (SCI 125) and/or SCI 138 and/or any course coded AGR.

MUS 138 Creative Musicianship – 1 credit

An examination of a broad range of topics related to serious music study. The instructor leads cooperative class investigation into areas such as creative expression through free improvisation, preparing for auditions and performances, breaking creative blocks, responding to performance anxiety, adopting stretches/exercises, exploring career paths, making demos, and booking gigs. NOTE: Students may repeat this course once for a maximum of 2 credits.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: LCMS or MRP majors only or permission of instructor

SCI 138 Soil Science – 4 credits

An introduction to the basic principles of soil science. Students study the physical, chemical and biological properties of soil as they relate to agriculture, horticulture, forestry, landscaping and environmental science. Topics include soil morphology, formation, fertility, chemistry, testing and conservation; ecological relationships; agricultural applications; plant nutrition and fertilization; environmental and water resource management. Special Requirement: Field trips required.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: MAT 090 or MAT 090S, ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090), satisfactory placement test scores

MUS 139 Contemporary Music Ensemble – 2 credits

An ensemble that performs modern musical styles of rock, pop, folk-rock, and rhythm and blues. In addition, the ensemble creates original works and explores post-1945 avant-garde musical styles that have influenced popular music since the 1960s. Students should expect to practice and develop skills for reading music and playing by ear. The ensemble performs publicly twice each semester. NOTE: Students may repeat this course three times for a maximum of 8 credits.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: Permission of instructor or Program Coordinator; basic instrumental or vocal proficiency; the ability to read and play chord changes

MUS 140 Vocal Jazz Ensemble – 2 credits

An ensemble-based study of vocal jazz for singers and instrumentalists. Beginning and intermediate singers learn jazz standard repertoire, stylistic techniques, and performance elements of singing with rhythm section accompaniment. Advanced instrumental students in the group learn and practice the art of accompanying singers in a vocal jazz combo context. Students perform publicly twice each semester. NOTE: Students may repeat this course three times for a maximum of 8 credits. Special Requirement: Vocalists need basic vocal proficiency, instrumentalists need advanced proficiency.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: All students need permission of instructor or Department Chair

CIS 140 Microcomputer Software Tools I – 3 credits

Provides students with a solid, production-oriented foundation in Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Access. Topics include processing and design essentials, and familiarization of many of the commonly-used tools and techniques to enable students to create high-quality documents, spreadsheets, presentations, and simple databases. This is a hands-on course. Special Requirement: Students not currently engaged in daily computer use should consider CIS 110 or a word processing or introduction to computing workshop prior to taking CIS 140.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090), and MAT 090 or MAT 090S, or satisfactory placement test scores

BUS 140 Entrepreneurship Seminar – 1 credit

An application of small business skills and principles to real situations. Students work individually and in a small group seminar on personalized entrepreneurship projects. The curriculum focuses the student on specific concepts, expertise, and skills that are the key to an actual business start-up. Typical projects involve problem definition, development of the team workplan, completion of research and analysis, derivation of conclusions and recommendations, execution, generation of a final report, and project evaluation. Using the concept of a balanced mentorship, the faculty and student(s) together develop specific course content and deliverables.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: Completion of at least 12 credits with the following course codes: ACC, BUS, CIS, ECO, or MOM; or permission of instructor.

HSV 141 Substance Use Disorders – 3 credits

Introduces students to current advances in addiction treatment by examining treatment outcome research, evidence-based approaches, and pharmacological advances in the field. Topics include: the neurobiology of addiction, substances of abuse, familial patterns of genetic transmission and epigenetics, cultural competence, and trauma-informed care. The course highlights the needs of special populations.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: PSY 101

EDU 141 Building Teacher-Parent Relationships – 3 credits

Examines the inherent complexities of the parent-teacher/caregiver relationship and explores techniques for improving communication. Diverse family structures will be examined and discussed in view of their implications for teachers, parents, and children with attention to increasing parent involvement and creating successful partnerships with parents.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

CIS 141 Microcomputer Software Tools II – 3 credits

Provides students with intermediate training in the use of Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. In addition to building upon software skills and techniques taught in CIS 140, students learn the integration of data created in various programs and the development of presentation-quality output. Students use application macro language to automate and customize documents, workbooks, and data entry operations. Students use graphics software to create business and multimedia presentations. This is a hands-on course.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: CIS 140

ART 141 Color – 3 credits

An exploration of the perceptual characteristics of color. Students develop sensitivity to color through direct visual experiences and practice. The course emphasizes color mixing and interaction in application.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores; Recomm: ART 121

PCS 141 Interpersonal Communication – 3 credits

Provides an opportunity for students to increase their ability to communicate effectively in daily interactions through the study of basic interpersonal communication concepts and the practice of speaking, listening, and conflict resolution skills. Students identify and analyze current communication patterns as a step toward increasing interpersonal communication competence.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 101, 103, or 105 or concurrent enrollment

SCI 141 Cosmic Life Becomes You: Scientific Literacy for Today – 4 credits

An introduction to the joy of science for all comers through the exploration of the beauty, wonder, and interconnectedness of the natural world. Together the class explores contemporary issues in cosmology, astronomy, physics, chemistry, biology, ecology, and art through dialogue, group research, and guest experts. The course helps the student to work with models, experimentation, and laboratory verification to understand the physical world.

(Offered: Every Summer)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090), MAT 090 or MAT 090S or satisfactory placement test scores.

PCS 142 Intercultural Communications – 3 credits

Provides training in understanding the importance of intercultural communication and theories. The course focuses on the communication processes that occur when individuals of differing cultural backgrounds come into direct contact with one another. Topics include definitions of communication; definitions of cultural communication elements; diversity of cultural patterns; cultural variables influencing communication, such as language, non-verbal behavior, perception, values, and beliefs; factors that facilitate or inhibit intercultural communication; and examination of American culture in comparison to other cultures.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 101, or ENG 103, or ENG 105, or concurrent enrollment in ENG 101 Recomm: PCS 141

OLP 143 Backcountry Travel Instructor I – 3 credits

Prepares students to become proficient in expedition planning, implementation and leadership of backcountry travel experiences while practicing and applying foundational skills in campcraft, land navigation, wilderness hiking and backpacking. Students learn core competencies of outdoor leadership, including diverse styles of leadership, risk management, group debriefing, and low-impact wilderness camping with a group. Students design and execute a backpacking expedition. Students participate in field trips. Special Requirement: This course involves moderate to high physical activity and the ability to be active and in the outdoors for 5 days and nights in a remote, forested environment in early winter conditions. Minimum age requirement 18 years for courses involving overnight stays. Off-campus field trips. All students must submit the OLP Health History and Physical Examination Attestation Form, completed and signed by a physician, verifying medical clearance for full participation. Students assume any travel and permit/pass costs associated with field trips.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores. OLP 111 or concurrent enrollment in OLP 111.

CIS 145 Relational Database Design and Application – 3 credits

Provides a foundation in business information management, data mining and business intelligence using a relational database. Topics include the theory of managing data; planning and design of a database; creation, normalization and management of tables; design and development of queries to extract specific information and data; creation of reports and forms for controlling ease and accuracy of data entry; and use of macros to automate operations. Students learn to create, manage, and extract data from a variety of common business database applications.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores; CIS 140 or permission of instructor.

MUS 147 Aural Skills I – 1 credit

A practice lab in which students develop music listening and reading skills. This course emphasizes practical applications including ear training, sight singing, transcription, dictation, and conducting.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: MUS 103 or permission of instructor; concurrent enrollment in MUS 107

OLP 147 Winter Mountaineering – 2 credits

Provides students with an introduction to the philosophy and principles of winter mountaineering in New England. Topics include equipment selection and use, mountain travel, objective hazard evaluation, safety systems, and alpine snow climbing techniques. This course introduces the American Institute for Avalanche Research and Education (AIARE) competencies and curriculum for avalanche awareness certificate. Students participate in local and regional field trips, including New Hampshire’s White Mountains. Special Requirement: This course involves moderate to high physical activity and the ability to be active and in the outdoors for 4 days and nights in a remote, alpine environment with sub-zero temperatures and full winter conditions. Minimum age requirement 18 years for courses involving overnight stays. Off-campus field trips. All students must submit the OLP Health History and Physical Examination Attestation Form, completed and signed by a physician, verifying medical clearance for full participation. Students assume any travel and permit/pass costs associated with field trips.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: OLP 143

MUS 148 Aural Skills II – 1 credit

A continuation of MUS 147, Aural Skills I.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: MUS 147 or permission of instructor; concurrent enrollment in MUS 108

OLP 148 Ice Climbing – 2 credits

Provides students with an introduction to the philosophy and principles of ice climbing in New England. Topics include: equipment selection and use, ice formation and assessment, objective hazard evaluation, safety systems, and ice climbing techniques. Students participate in local and regional field trips. Special Requirement: This course involves moderate to high physical activity and the ability to be active and in the outdoors for multiple days in a remote, forested environment in mid-winter conditions with sub-freezing temperatures. Off-campus field trips. All students must submit the OLP Health History and Physical Examination Attestation Form, completed and signed by a physician, verifying medical clearance for full participation. Students assume any travel and permit/pass costs associated with field trips.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: Prior technical climbing experience and permission of OLP Program Coordinator. Recomm: Wilderness First Responder certification preferred. Prior experience leading groups on climbing experiences preferred.

OLP 149 Introduction to Nordic Skiing – 1 credit

Introduces foundational skills in Nordic track and skate and Nordic downhill ski disciplines. Topics include beginner and intermediate cross country track and ski touring skills for both on-and off-trail skiing in low to moderate elevation snow terrain. Students participate in regional field trips. Special Requirement: This course involves moderate to high physical activity and the ability to be active and in the outdoors for a full day in a remote, forested environment in sub-freezing temperatures and full winter conditions. Off-campus field trips. All students must submit the OLP Health History and Physical Examination Attestation Form, completed and signed by a physician, verifying medical clearance for full participation. Students assume any travel and permit/pass costs associated with field trips.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: None

MUS 150 African Percussion Ensemble – 2 credits

A course in African and African diaspora drumming and percussion genres from around the world. Students learn traditional rhythms and improvisational techniques on various instruments including ashiko drums, conga drums, West African balaphon, bells, rattles, and shakers. Classes focus on rehearsing techniques, group interaction, and traditional repertoire from various world music cultures. The ensemble performs in concert at least twice at the end of each semester. The variety of instruments and instrumental roles allows both experienced and beginner students to join at any time. NOTE: Students may repeat this course three times for a maximum of 8 credits.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None

EVS 150 The 24-Hour Outdoor Personal Growth Experience – 1 credit

A 24-hour back-country experience focusing on the expansion of the individual’s awareness and sensitivity to his or her relationship with the environment through interpretation and participation in its cyclical rhythms. The course also includes one or two in-class sessions. NOTE: Course graded credit/no credit. Students may receive credit for EVS 150 or HEC 150, but not for both. Special Requirement: Students must be 18 to register for this course.

(Offered: Fall in odd numbered years)Prereq: None

CIS 150 Programming Principles and Concepts – 3 credits

Computer problem-solving principles and techniques for students contemplating a career in computer programming, or computer information systems. Structured problem-solving methods are introduced, including techniques for decomposing complex problems, and expressing the problem solutions in terms which can be expressed in any computer programming language.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094, (COL 090), and MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S, or satisfactory placement test scores.

OLP 150 Fundamentals of Technical Rock Climbing – 3 credits

Provides students with an introduction to the philosophy, principles, and practices of technical rock climbing. Topics include equipment selection and use, objective hazard evaluation, safety systems, and rock climbing techniques that are consistent with the standards set by the Professional Climbing Instructor’s Association (PCIA). Students participate in local and regional field trips. Special Requirement: This course involves moderate to high physical activity and the ability to be active and in the outdoors for a full day in a remote, forested environment. All students must submit the OLP Health History and Physical Examination Attestation Form, completed and signed by a physician, verifying medical clearance for full participation. Students assume any travel and permit/pass costs associated with field trips.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: None

MUS 151 The Beatles and Radiohead Ensemble – 2 credits

A small group combo/band that learns, rehearses, and performs music from the Beatles and Radiohead. Students learn music both by ear and from published scores. Students should expect to practice and develop skills for reading music, playing by ear, improvisation, and small group performance. The ensemble performs public concerts twice each semester. NOTE: Students may repeat this course three times for a maximum of 8 credits.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: Permission of instructor or Department Chair; basic instrumental or vocal proficiency; the ability to read and play chord changes.

MAT 151 Applied Calculus I – 4 credits

Provides a practical approach to the basic tools and methods of calculus. A brief review of polynomial, rational, exponential, and log functions is included in the course. Students study topics that include limits, the derivative, the definite integral, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Students learn how to interpret derivatives and integrals in the context of calculus models and applications from many fields.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: A grade of C- or better in MAT 107 or satisfactory placement test scores; ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores. Placement tests are used only for initial course placement; see catalog for details.

FST 151 Principles of Emergency Services – 3 credits

Provides an overview to fire protection and emergency services; career opportunities in fire protection and related fields; culture and history of emergency services; fire loss analysis; organization and function of public and private fire protection services; fire departments as part of local government; laws and regulations affecting the fire service; fire service nomenclature; specific fire protection functions; basic fire chemistry and physics; introduction to fire protection systems; introduction to fire strategy and tactics; and life safety initiatives. NOTE: Students may receive credit for FST 151 or FST 101, but not for both.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores.

EVS 151 Youth, Culture and Rites of Passage in Contemporary America – 1 credit

Investigates vision quest and rites of passage, ancient and contemporary ceremonies, and rituals that are found in most cultural traditions to assist individuals to pass symbolically and literally from youth to adulthood. This experiential course offers instruction in phases of personal transition, and connections to the natural environment to promote clarity and connections with the environment. Opportunities include in-the-field teachings and one night and two days of residency at a solo site in a backcountry area, and personal reflection through inner guidance. NOTE: Course graded credit/no credit. Students may receive credit for EVS 151 or HEC 151, but not for both. Special Requirement: Students must be 18 to register for this course.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: None

CIS 151 Web Site Development – 3 credits

A study of the creation of effective web sites and pages for use on the Internet or as an Intranet. Topics include: creating web sites and pages with a web site development tool; managing site presentation with Layers; block level elements and Cascading Style Sheets; Dynamic Web Templates; and behaviors. Students explore and modify HTML, CSS and JavaScript code, manage a web site’s associated files and folders; manage the web publishing client/server process and administration of a web site. Students create and enhance a number of web sites in this course. Students need dependable internet access as part of this course. Special Requirement: Students not currently engaged in daily computer use should consider CIS 110 or a word processing or introduction to computing workshop prior to taking CIS 140.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), and MAT 090 or MAT 090S, or satisfactory placement test scores.

ART 151 Photography Foundation – 3 credits

Introduces the visual, critical, and technical issues of photography. Students learn the essential aspects of camera control and functionality leading to the production of a body of printed work. Special Requirement: Students must provide their own digital camera, preferably with shutter speed and f-stop controls.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test score; Recomm: ART 121 and ENG 090 or satisfactory placement test score

ACC 151 Concepts of Financial Accounting I – 3 credits

An introduction to accounting principles and theory for the corporation. The course concentrates on the recording of business transactions through the accounting cycle, from journalizing, posting, adjusting, and closing to the preparation of financial statements. Additional topics include merchandise and inventory accounting. The course also focuses on how general purpose financial statements communicate information about the business corporation’s performance and position for users of financial statements.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), and MAT 090 or MAT 090S, or satisfactory placement test scores

MUS 152 American Traditional Music Ensemble – 2 credits

A band comprised of acoustic instrumental players and singers that collaboratively learns, rehearses and performs music from the American period of 1850-1950, including immigrant and intercultural music traditions of the period that were commonly played in community or in concert. Participants develop repertoire each semester according to instrumentation, group abilities, and interests. Students complete critical listening assignments to support learning historical and cultural context for the repertoire. Students learn music both by ear and from published scores. Students should expect to practice and develop skills for reading music, playing by ear, improvisation, and small group performance. The ensemble performs public concerts twice each semester. NOTE: Students may repeat this course three times for a maximum of 8 credits.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: Permission of instructor or Department Chair; basic instrumental or vocal proficiency; the ability to read and play chord changes.

FST 152 Fire Behavior and Combustion – 3 credits

Explores the theories and fundamentals of how and why fires start, spread, and are controlled.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores.

ART 152 Film and the Darkroom – 3 credits

Introduces the visual, critical, and technical issues of darkroom-based black and white photography. The course covers the essential aspects of camera control and functionality when working with film and chemistry. Students produce a portfolio of silver gelatin prints.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 094 (COL 090) or concurrent enrollment or satisfactory placement test score; Recomm: ENG 090 or satisfactory placement score

ACC 152 Concepts of Financial Accounting II – 3 credits

A continuation of ACC 151. Topics include internal control and accounting for cash, accounts receivable, property and equipment and related depreciation, intangible assets, long term liabilities, accounting for a partnership, payroll accounting, and preparation of the cash flows statement. The student completes a detailed analysis of a corporate annual report with an emphasis on the analysis and interpretation of financial information.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ACC 151

MUS 153 The World of Music and the Human Spirit – 3 credits

An exploration of connections between music and identity, spirituality, and social protest using case studies in western and non-western musical traditions. Topics include, among others, African-American expressions in cultural context, Indian classical music used cross-culturally, and Middle Easter improvisational music as an experiential religious tradition. Students study concepts of rhythm, melody, harmony, and form which are used for musical analysis by students at varied and individualized levels within the course. Students learn to think, ask questions, and participate in discussions about how music is both rooted in historical-cultural context and plays a role in shaping evolving culture.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores.

FST 153 Fire Prevention – 3 credits

Provides fundamental knowledge relating to the field of fire prevention. Topics include: history and philosophy of fire prevention; organization and operation of a fire prevention bureau; use and application of codes and standards; plans review; fire inspections; fire and life safety education; and fire investigation. NOTE: Students may receive credit for FST 153 or FST 125, but not for both.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores.

EVS 153 Ancient Wilderness Living Skills – 1 credit

An introduction to the principles and practices of ancient wilderness living skills that enable people to live closer to the earth and to realize a deeper understanding of their heritage as human beings. The course introduces students to the following skills: carving and using a bow and drill fire making set; building and sleeping in a shelter made from natural materials; and instruction in crafts like natural baskets, wooden utensils, and natural rope. The course includes backcountry foraging for wild edible foods and materials for crafts as well as an overnight residency experience. NOTE: Course graded credit/no credit. Students may receive credit for EVS 153 or HEC 153, but not for both. Special Requirement: Students must be 18 to register for this course.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: None

CMN 153 Media and Popular Culture – 3 credits

A general overview of the history and influence of mass media on popular culture. The course examines advertising, books, newspapers, magazines, radio, film, television, gaming, music, and the internet with a focus on developing visual literacy and critical thinking skills. NOTE: Students may receive credit for CMN 153 or HUM 153, but not for both.

(Offered: Every Summer)Prereq: ENG 101, 103, or 105

MUS 154 Audio Recording and Production I – 3 credits

Introduces students to basic practices in computer based audio recording, editing, and mixing. The course teaches students how to use Pro Tools software and hardware interfaces to make multi-track recordings. The course also introduces students to the role to the music producer. NOTE: Students may receive credit for MUS 154 or MUS 221 but not for both. Special Requirement: Students are required to own studio reference headphones and one dedicated 1 Tb Mac compatible external hard drive. Course has Digital Recording Music Fee of $20.00.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 094, or satisfactory placement test score, or concurrent enrollment in ENG 094

FST 154 Principles of Fire and Emergency Services Safety and Survival – 3 credits

Introduces the basic principles and history related to the national firefighter life safety initiatives, focusing on the need for cultural and behavior change throughout the emergency services.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores.

EVS 154 Exploring Ecological Consciousness – 1 credit

Explores experiential education practices that shift students’ perception towards an awareness of being part of the natural world, directly related to other life forms and ecologies. Students increase their knowledge of nature awareness exercises for diverse age ranges and backgrounds. The course includes experiential exercises, visualization and personal sharing in the natural environment. NOTE: Course graded credit/no credit. Students may receive credit for EVS 154 or HEC 154, but not for both.

(Offered: Fall in even numbered years)Prereq: None

FST 155 Building Construction for Fire Protection – 3 credits

Provides the components of building construction related to firefighter and life safety. The elements of construction and design of structures are shown to be key factors when inspecting buildings, preplanning fire operations, and operating at emergencies. NOTE: Students may receive credit for FST 155 or FST 111, but not both.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores.

EVS 155 Introduction to Sustainable Energy: Solar Living – 1 credit

An introduction to the basic principles and practical applications of sustainable energy systems for small-scale use in the home, office, and work space. The course introduces the basics of renewable energy and sustainable living technologies. The seminar introduces the operation and maintenance of rechargeable solar equipment, independent living techniques and wind, biomass, hydrogen, and conservation strategies for heating and cooling. NOTE: Course graded credit/no credit. Students may receive credit for EVS 155 or HEC 155, but not for both.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: None

BUS 155 Business Law – 3 credits

An introduction to the practice and application of business law with an emphasis upon ethical decision making. Topics include the legal system, ethical decision making, dispute resolution, contract law, and sales contract law under the Uniform Commercial Code.

(Offered: Every Spring & Summer)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

ART 155 Video Foundation – 3 credits

An art-based introduction to digital video. Topics include instruction in the use of digital video cameras, non-linear editing platforms, and digital sound. Students study video as a form of artistic expression with an emphasis on the development of the compositional, shooting, editing, conceptual, and critical skills associated with time-based media.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test score; Recomm: ART 121 and ENG 090 or satisfactory placement test score

FST 156 Hazardous Materials Chemistry – 3 credits

Provides basic chemistry relating to the categories of hazardous materials including recognition, identification, reactivity, and health hazards encountered by emergency services. NOTE: Students may receive credit for FST 156 or FST 109, but not both.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: FST 151; CHE 105 or CHE 111; or permission of instructor or program coordinator.

FST 157 Fire Protection Hydraulics & Water Supply – 3 credits

Provides a foundation of theoretical knowledge in order to understand the principles of the use of water in fire protection and to apply hydraulic principles to analyze and to solve water supply problems. NOTE: Students may receive credit for FST 157 or FST 113, but not for both.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090), and MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S or satisfactory placement test scores.

FST 158 Principles of Fire and Emergency Service Administration – 3 credits

Introduces the student to the organization and management of a fire and emergency services department and the relationship of government agencies to the fire service. Emphasis is placed on fire and emergency service, ethics, and leadership from the perspective of the company officer. NOTE: Students may receive credit for FST 158 or FST 105, but not for both.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores.

FST 159 Fire Protection Systems – 3 credits

Provides information relating to the features of design and operation of fire alarm systems, water-based fire suppression systems, special hazard fire suppression systems, water supply for fire protection and portable fire extinguishers. NOTE: Students may receive credit for FST 201 or FST 159 but not for both.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores.

LED 161 Golf – 1 credit

Designed for beginners interested in the basic skills of recreational golf. Students advance at their own pace. Topics include golf rules and etiquette. Students participate in field trips.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: None

ART 161 Computer Arts Foundation – 3 credits

Introduces the computer as a medium for the creation of works of art. Students work through a series of problems that investigate different approaches to the medium providing a solid foundation in computer-based creation.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test score; Recomm: ART 121 and ENG 090 or satisfactory placement test score

LED 167 Introductory Tae Kwon Do I (Karate) – 1 credit

A basic introduction to the Korean martial art of Tae Kwon Do-Moo Duk Kwan as it has evolved from its origins from Tae Kyun in approximately 57 BC. Emphasis is on familiarization with some Korean language, stretching exercises, calisthenics, punching, blocking, and kicking techniques, practical self-defense, hyung patterns of movement and exposure to some of the philosophical underpinnings of Tae Kwon Do.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None

LED 168 Introductory Tae Kwon Do II (Karate) – 1 credit

Intermediate level skills and techniques of the Korean martial art of Tae Kwon Do-Moo Duk Kwan as it has evolved from its origins in Tae Kyun in approximately 57 BC. The emphasis is on familiarization with some Korean language, stretching exercises, calisthenics, punching, block, and kicking techniques, practical self-defense, hyung patterns of movement and exposure to some of the philosophical underpinnings of Tae Kwon Do.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: LED 167 or permission of instructor

HSV 168 Case Management Practices – 3 credits

An in-depth analysis of the case management process from a generalist prospective. The course focuses on evidence-based practices in contemporary case management, clarification of practitioner attitudes, effective communication skills, client assessment, service plan development, case documentation, the monitoring of services and treatment, and case termination. Other topics include: crisis intervention, group work, substance use disorders, legal interventions, advocacy and cultural competence.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores; PSY 101 or concurrent enrollment in PSY 101; HSV 101 or HSV 107 or concurrent enrollment in HSV 101 or HSV 107.

LED 170 Gentle Yoga – 1 credit

Introduces students to gentle yoga practice with an emphasis on stress reduction and body awareness. Each session includes gentle movement warm-up and a series of gentle yoga postures, breath awareness, guided relaxation and meditation. Students gain sufficient practical knowledge to sustain independent yoga practice.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None

LED 171 Yoga – 1 credit

An introduction to Hatha Yoga practice. Students learn classical yoga postures such as standing poses, backbends, forward bends, hip openers, balances, inversions and restorative poses. Students study alignment principles of Yoga and incorporate basic philosophy, meditation and deep relaxation into each class for a well-rounded, active and enjoyable practice. The course follows a sequential flow building knowledge and skills from week to week. Students gain sufficient practical knowledge to sustain independent yoga practice.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None

LED 172 Self-Defense for Women – 2 credits

Introduces physical and psychological skills necessary for self-defense. Involves learning the use of various parts of the body as weapons. Examines techniques of awareness necessary for prevention. Through meditation, discussion, and writing exercises, students learn to realize and overcome women’s psychological blocks to their own defense.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: For women only

HSV 172 Practicum in Addiction Studies I – 4 credits

The first of two practicum experiences in the Addiction Studies Certificate program. Students participate in a 150-hour practicum experience in a community agency that provides services and support to individuals with substance use disorders. Students utilize the 12 core functions of a licensed alcohol and drug counselor (LADC). Students demonstrate professional conduct and appropriate work habits. Students participate in a 2-hour a week seminar experience for additional personal/professional support, supervision, feedback and exploration of field-related experiences. The course provides the opportunity to enhance/augment knowledge and skills related to working with clients with a substance use disorder. The course emphasizes confidentiality, professionalism, ethical principles and conduct. Placement in an agency site for HSV 172 is not guaranteed and depends upon agreement among the agency site, the HSV faculty, and the student. Special Requirement: This course must be completed with a C or better to count towards the Addiction Studies Certificate. Students assume travel costs to agency site.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: HSV 115 or concurrent enrollment in HSV 115; HSV 107 or concurrent enrollment in HSV 107; HSV 168 or concurrent enrollment in HSV 168, PSY 101 or concurrent enrollment in PSY 101; must be an Addiction Studies Certificate major or a Liberal Arts/Human Services Option major and have permission of the Human Services Program coordinator.

ART 173 Digital Design – 3 credits

An exploration of the tools and processes of digital design. The course emphasizes development of strong visual and technical skills in digital design, layout, and illustration.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ART 121 and ART 161

CIS 180 Network Workstation Administration – 3 credits

Provides a basic working knowledge of installing, setting up, and administering workstations using a current operating system. Topics include installing and configuring workstations to operate on a variety of network topologies. Other topics include configuring protocols, security, sharing of resources, and allowing access to information. Students set up, debug, and troubleshoot actual workstation installations.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: CIS 140 or CIS major; and ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores.

DAN 183 Ballroom Dance: American Smooth Style – 1 credit

Provides physical enjoyment to participants through the performance of the specific rhythms and movements of American smooth style dancing and social interaction through group participation. Topics include the fundamentals of waltz, fox trot, jitterbug (swing), with an emphasis on dance positions, leading and following, and dance etiquette. NOTE: Students may repeat this course once for a maximum of two credits. Special Requirement: Lightweight shoes with non-skid soles.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: None

DAN 184 Ballroom Dance: Latin Style – 1 credit

Provides physical enjoyment to participants through the performance of the specific rhythms and movements of Latin style dancing and social interaction through group participation. Topics include the fundamentals of rumba, cha cha, and tango with an emphasis on dance positions, leading and following, and dance etiquette. NOTE: Students may repeat this course once for a maximum of two credits. Special Requirement: Lightweight shoes with non-skid soles.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: None

BIO 194 Comprehensive Anatomy and Physiology – 4 credits

A one semester survey of human anatomy and physiology. Students learn basic concepts of chemistry and cytology in order to understand human systems as well as the structure and function of organs, organ systems and their interactions. This course may involve dissection. NOTE: Students may receive credit for only one of the following: BIO 105 or BIO 107 or BIO 117 or BIO 194 or BIO 215 (BIO 195). Students may receive credit for BIO 106 or BIO 216 (BIO 196), but not for both.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

ENG 195 Introduction to Literary Journal Publishing – 3 credits

Guides students through the process of producing a literary journal. Students solicit, evaluate and edit submissions for publication in GCC’s literary journal. This course includes promotion and production and prepares students to enter the wider literary market. Students may repeat this course for up to 6 credits.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 101, 103 or 105 and permission of the instructor.

ACS 200 Professional Art Practices – 3 credits

An examination of the visual arts beyond the studio. Study includes creative career paths available to the artist, application processes, the writing of artist statements, portfolio documentation and presentation. Class participates in Art Department gallery events and museum/gallery visits. Special Requirement: Attending off-campus meetings at other schools, museums, galleries, and artist’s studios; students assume any travel costs and make arrangements for their own transportation.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 101, 103, or 105 and two 200-level ART studio courses or permission of the instructor.

MAT 201 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I – 4 credits

Theoretical and applied calculus for students interested in mathematics, engineering, and the physical sciences. A prerequisite knowledge of power, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions is assumed. Students study topics that include limits, continuity, differentiation, antidifferentiation, the definite integral, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Students work with applications throughout the course to help them understand and connect calculus concepts to real world situations.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: A grade of C- or better in MAT 108 or satisfactory placement test scores; and approval from Math Dept.; ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores. Placement tests are used only for initial course placement; see catalog for details.

FRE 201 Intermediate French I – 4 credits

The intermediate study of French. The course emphasizes continued acquisition of language functions, vocabulary, idioms, structures, and culture through contextualized presentations, interactive activities, video, and selected readings. The instructor and the students conduct the class in French.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: FRE 102 or equivalent.

EDU 201 Early Childhood Curriculum – 3 credits

Examines the components of the early childhood curriculum including theory, approaches, materials, standards, and evaluation. Students develop content knowledge in the major domains of learning and development. The course emphasizes the fundamental role of play and how to intentionally incorporate this into curriculum. Students practice designing curriculum from an emergent and integrated perspective. Student must complete 2 hours of field observation in an early education and care program approved by the program coordinator. Students provide their own transportation.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 101, 103 or 105; EDU 101 with a grade of C- or higher or permission of program coordinator.

DAN 201 Performance Project: Dance in Community – 3 credits

Provides an opportunity for students to work together as members of a student dance company to choreograph, teach/learn, and rehearse dances in a variety of styles to be performed in area schools, senior centers, at the college, and for special events. When appropriate, students assist in teaching dance classes and give lecture/demonstrations. Cooperatively students manage production responsibilities for the performances. Students perform and rehearse outside of class time. NOTE: The course may be repeated once for a maximum of 6 credits.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: A 100 level DAN course, or permission of the instructor.

CMN 201 The Social Impact of Mass Media – 3 credits

An in-depth, focused analysis of a specific theme/topic in mass media (film, TV, print, music, and video games) in order to examine social and cultural issues such as race, class, and gender. Each semester the instructor selects the topic or major theme/focus of the course. NOTE: Students may receive credit for CMN 201 or HUM 240 (The Zombie in Media and Popular Culture), but not for both.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 101, 103, or 105 Recomm: CMN 153 (HUM 153)

CIS 201 Introduction to Discrete Computation – 4 credits

An introduction to discrete mathematics. Students study structures and concepts useful to computer science from the following areas: set theory, strings and formal languages, propositional and predicate calculus, relations and functions, and basic number theory. Additional topics include: interplay of inductive definition, inductive proof, combinatorics, recursive algorithms, search on graphs and trees, finite-state machines, regular languages, nondeterministic finite automata, and Kleene’s Theorem.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: MAT 201 and MAT 202 (or concurrent enrollment in MAT 202)

CHE 201 Organic Chemistry I – 4 credits

Introduction to the chemistry of carbon compounds. In-depth study of the structure, physical properties, and reactivity of alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkenes, alkynes, and conjugated unsaturated systems. Special topics integrated into the survey include conformational analysis, nucleophilic substitution, elimination reactions, electrophilic addition, and stereochemistry of chiral molecules. Lab required.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: CHE 112

ASL 201 Intermediate American Sign Language I – 4 credits

Offers the student continuing opportunities for hands-on experience in language learning. A critical component of the course is the use of video text to improve conversational skills at the intermediate level and to preserve the integrity of the language. The course emphasizes a deeper understanding of Deaf norms, allowing students to learn appropriate behavior in order to function comfortably in a wide variety of situations in the Deaf community.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ASL 101 and 102, or permission of instructor

AHS 201 Art Now – 3 credits

Examines the recent art and artists that have promoted significant change in the art world. Students critically discuss the thinking behind this art, the process through which it becomes recognized as art, and how we understand the impact and aesthetic of a new art that is unfamiliar and may challenge what we consider “art” to be. NOTE: Students may receive credit for ACS 201 or AHS 201, but not for both. Special Requirement: Students may be required to visit major exhibitions in NYC during the department New York trip. Students assume any travel costs.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 101, 103, or 105; ART 121 or permission of the department chair.

ACS 201 Art Now – 3 credits

Examines the recent art and artists that have promoted significant change in the art world. Students critically discuss the thinking behind this art, the process through which it becomes recognized as art, and how we understand the impact and aesthetic of a new art that is unfamiliar and may challenge what we consider “art” to be. NOTE: Students may receive credit for either ACS 201 or AHS 201, but not for both. Special Requirement: Students may be required to visit major exhibitions in NYC during the department New York trip. Students assume any travel costs.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 101, 103, or 105; ART 121 or permission of the department chair.

OLP 201 Individual Project in Outdoor Leadership – 2 credits

A student-directed learning project designed to explore and expand upon the student’s professional goals and personal ambitions in the outdoor adventure industry. Students complete and present a project which involves a significant expedition plan, curriculum developmental, or business plan.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: Any 100 level OLP course.

SOC 201 Social Problems – 3 credits

A sociological examination of the nature, structure, causes, and consequences of social problems, with a particular focus on their interconnections. The course uses major theoretical frameworks to examine social problems at both the micro and macro level. The course investigates a variety of social problems, with a focus on problems in the United States. The course examines how to define and distinguish social problems from social issues.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: SOC 101 or SOC 106

SPA 201 Intermediate Spanish I – 4 credits

The intermediate study of Spanish. The course emphasizes continued acquisition of language functions, vocabulary, idioms, structures, and culture through contextualized presentations, interactive activities, video, and selected readings. The instructor and the students conduct the class in Spanish.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: SPA 102 or equivalent.

MAT 202 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II – 4 credits

A second semester calculus course for students interested in mathematics, engineering, and the physical sciences. Students study topics that include graphical and numerical antiderivatives, indefinite integrals, the fundamental theorems of calculus, integration techniques, improper integrals, applications of the integral, sequences, series, convergence tests, power series, Taylor series, and differential equations. Students work with applications throughout the course to help them understand and connect calculus concepts to real world situations.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: A grade of C- or better in MAT 201; ENG 090 or ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores.

FRE 202 Intermediate French II – 4 credits

Conclusion of the basic intermediate sequence in French. The course emphasizes continued acquisition of language functions, vocabulary, idioms, structures, and culture through contextualized presentations, interactive activities, video, and selected readings. The instructor and the students conduct the class in French.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: FRE 201 or equivalent.

EMS 202 Pharmacology – 2 credits

Introduces pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The course includes a review of the metric system. Students calculate drug dosage concentrations and IV medication infusion rates. The course introduces basic concepts of pathophysiology.

(Offered: Every January)Prereq: Successful completion of EMS 105 or permission of instructor

CHE 202 Organic Chemistry II – 4 credits

In-depth study of aromatic compounds, physical methods of structure determination, organic halides, organometallic compounds, alcohols, phenols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, carboxylic acid derivatives, amines, and amides. Examination of various classes of natural products. Introduction to biochemistry. Polymers and polymerization. Lab required.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: CHE 201

SPA 202 Intermediate Spanish II – 4 credits

Conclusion of the basic intermediate sequence in Spanish. The course emphasizes continued acquisition of language functions, vocabulary, idioms, structures, and culture through contextualized presentations, interactive activities, video, and selected readings. The instructor and the students conduct the class in Spanish.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: SPA 201 or equivalent.

MAT 203 Multivariate Calculus – 4 credits

Theoretical and applied multivariate calculus for students interested in mathematics, engineering, and the physical sciences. The course assumes an understanding of single variable calculus. Topics include vectors, the dot and cross products, multiple representations of functions of several variables, the gradient and directional derivatives, first and second order partial derivatives with applications including Lagrange multipliers, iterated integrals, parameterization, vector fields, line integrals, and Green’s Theorem.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: A grade of C- or better in MAT 202; ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores.

GEO 203 Global Climate Change – 4 credits

An introduction to Earth’s climate system including the fundamentals of Earth’s energy balance, the hydrologic cycle, and atmospheric circulation. Topics include the greenhouse effect, climate forcings and feedbacks, climate indicators, the evolution of Earth’s atmosphere, past climates, influence of humans on climate, observed and projected climate changes, and consequences of global warming. NOTE: students may receive credit for GEO 203 or GEO 108, but not for both.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 101, ENG 103, or ENG 105, MAT 107 (or concurrent enrollment in MAT 107 or satisfactory placement test scores) , and one of the following lab science courses: BIO 120, BIO 126, CHE 111, SCI 103, SCI 117, SCI 120, SCI 138, or any course coded GEO or PHY

ENG 203 American Literature I – 3 credits

Critical study of significant achievements in American literature from the Puritan period through the period of the Reconstruction. Emphasis on the growth of an American literature, its modes and purposes.

(Offered: Every Other Fall)Prereq: ENG 112, 114, or 116

EMS 203 Management of Medical and Shock-Trauma Emergencies – 8 credits

Expands upon pharmacological interventions and integrates patient management skills with medical and trauma situations encountered by paramedics. This course includes the pathophysiology and management of disease processes and shock-trauma conditions. It provides special considerations of neonatology, pediatrics, geriatrics, medical incident command and rescue situations. Students begin limited clinical experiences. Students receive PreHospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) certification and Pediatric Education for Prehospital Professionals (PEPP-Advanced Life Support) certification upon successful course completion.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: Successful completion of EMS 202 or permission of instructor

DAN 203 Jazz Dance III – 3 credits

An intermediate course in jazz dance. Students continue to develop and refine skills and movement vocabulary in the jazz style. Increased emphasis on performance skills, clarity of rhythm and line, expansion of range of movement, and personal expression and performance skills. The course presents the history of jazz dance as a fusion form with African roots, and its impact as a performance style and in the entertainment industry through lecture, video viewing, outside of class reading and writing assignments, or performance attendance.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: DAN 104, or permission of instructor

CRJ 203 Criminal Investigation – 3 credits

Examines fundamentals of investigation; crime scene search and recording, collection and preservation of physical evidence; scientific aids; modus operandi; sources of information; interview and interrogation; follow-up and case preparation.

(Offered: Spring in odd numbered years)Prereq: CRJ 101 and CRJ 105. Recomm: CRJ 103

BUS 203 Human Resources Management – 3 credits

Provides a practical approach to the tasks of recruiting, hiring, training, and compensating employees. Students explore opportunity, motivation, health and safety, and labor relations.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: BUS 111 or BUS 112 or BUS 114 or SPO 101; Recomm: PSY 101

ACC 203 Management Accounting – 3 credits

An introduction to the process of gathering and analyzing accounting data for use by managers in planning, decision-making, and controlling. Topics include basic cost concepts, cost volume-profit relationships, relevant cost decisions, capital investment decisions performance evaluation, and budgeting. The student uses spreadsheet software.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ACC 152 or ACC 122; CIS 140 or permission of instructor

POL 203 American Civil Liberties – 3 credits

Freedom of expression in history and in contemporary America; the role of the Supreme Court in the maintenance of civil liberties; the influence of official and popular pressures. Includes consideration of religion, assembly, the press and speech, as well as the rights of the accused and constitutional standards of equality.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores

SOC 203 Sociology of the Family – 3 credits

A sociological examination of the family. Students analyze the impact of race, class, gender, and sexuality on the family in the United States. The course investigates the effects of social issues and social policies on the family. Students learn about the dynamic relationship between the family and other social institutions.

(Offered: Spring in even numbered years)Prereq: SOC 101 or SOC 106 or PSY 101.

NUR 204 Trends and Issues in Nursing – 3 credits

Focuses on the political, social, economic, and legal issues that influence the nursing care delivery across local, national, and global health care systems. The course investigates career opportunities, advanced nursing education, and credentialing activities related to licensure and professional practice. Students work on an in-depth group project, presenting evidence-based information to peers as a major component of the course. The course explores the nurse’s role as team leader, with an emphasis on high quality, safe and effective, patient-centered care in various health care settings.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: NUR 201A (NUR 201) with a grade of C+ or better and successful completion of NUR 201C. NUR 203A (NUR 203) with a grade of C+ or better and successful completion of NUR 203C. Either a grade of C or better in one of the following: ENG 112, ENG 114, ENG 116 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112, ENG 114, or ENG 116; Either a grade of C or better in one 3-4 credit course from the list of Humanities and Fine Arts General Education electives or concurrent enrollment in one 3-4 credit course from the list of Humanities and Fine Arts General Education electives. This course is limited to AD Nursing majors only. Recomm: Concurrent enrollment in NUR 202A and NUR 202C

MAT 204 Elementary Differential Equations – 4 credits

An introduction to ordinary differential equations with a dual focus on finding analytic solutions and on solving and understanding differential equations using numeric and qualitative approaches. Topics include separation of variables, methods of undetermined coefficients, integrating factor method, Euler’s method, phase planes, first order linear systems, second order differential equations, an introduction to nonlinear systems, and LaPlace transforms. Throughout the course, students use and formulate differential equations that model real-world situations. Students use computer software and/or graphing calculators in and out of class to apply and enhance their understanding of differential equations and their solutions.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: A grade of C- or better in MAT 203; ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores.

GEO 204 Earth History – 4 credits

The evolution of Earth’s interior and surface throughout geologic history including interactions between the hydrosphere, atmosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere (life). The course emphasizes Earth’s changing climate, chemistry, and physical makeup over the past 4.5 billion years. Topics include geologic time, principles of stratigraphy and correlation, interpretation of rocks and fossils, mass extinctions, and the geologic evolution of Earth. NOTE: students may receive credit for GEO 204 or GEO 102, but not for both. Special Requirement: Field trips are required. Students assume any travel costs.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 101, ENG 103, or ENG 105 and one lab science course coded BIO or GEO. Recomm: GEO 101

EVS 204 Environmental Justice – 3 credits

A social and ecological examination of human needs and scarce resources. Students focus on environmental justice and how sustainable development contributes to reduced conflict and increased security. Students learn new strategies for sustainable living and an ecological perspective as a tool for peace, sustainability and social change.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: Any 3-credit course from the list of Behavioral and Social Sciences General Education Electives in the college catalog; Recomm: EVS 101

ENG 204 American Literature II – 3 credits

Critical study of significant achievements in American literature from the late 19th century to the present. Emphasis on literary modes and thought as they reflect the modern society.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 112, 114, or 116

EMS 204 Management of Cardiovascular Emergencies – 8 credits

A comprehensive approach to adult cardiac emergencies encountered by paramedics. The course includes cardiovascular pathophysiology, 3-lead and 12-lead dysrhythmia interpretation techniques, dysrhythmia management, electrical therapy and cardiac pharmacology. Students practice intensive patient management simulation. The student receives Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) certification upon successful course completion.

(Offered: Every Summer)Prereq: Successful completion of EMS 203 or permission of instructor

DAN 204 Jazz Dance IV – 3 credits

A conclusion of the intermediate study of jazz dance. Students continue to refine skills and movement vocabulary of the jazz style at the intermediate level. Emphasis on clarity of rhythm and line, expansion of range of movement, personal expression and confident performance. Assignments may include lecture, video viewing, outside of class reading and writing assignments, or performance attendance.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: DAN 203

SOC 204 Sociology of Education – 3 credits

A sociological understanding of the role of the educational system in the United States. The course investigates the function of schooling, the social stratification evident in schools, and the outcomes of the educational process. Students investigate the relationship between education policy and practice and everyday educational experiences. Students study the consequences of social inequality, especially as rooted in economics and funding for education. The course focuses on an overall understanding of the role of public education as it is constructed in our lives.

(Offered: Fall in even numbered years)Prereq: SOC 101, SOC 106, EDU 111, EDU 101, or PSY 101

MAT 205 Elementary Linear Algebra – 4 credits

The study of matrices and vector spaces. Topics include the algebra of matrices, systems of linear equations, determinants, subspaces, linear independence, bases, linear transformations and their matrix representations, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, orthogonality, and applications to linear systems.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: A grade of C- or better in MAT 202; ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores.

ENG 205 British Literature I – 3 credits

Readings in English literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the late 17th century. Major emphasis on Chaucer and Shakespeare.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 112, 114, or 116

EGR 205 Statics – 3 credits

A vector treatment of equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies. Topics include: forces, moments, couples, equations of equilibrium, free body diagrams, machines, trusses, frames, friction and centroids, and shear and bending moment diagrams.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: MAT 201, PHY 111

EDU 205 Philosophy of Education – 3 credits

Examines the role of school in society, the organization and history of American education, the historical foundations of education and its theorists. The relationship between theoretical perspectives and current issues emphasized.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 101, 103, or 105

BUS 205 Principles of Management – 3 credits

An introduction to managerial roles and functions. Topics include planning, organizing, controlling, leading, staffing, and decision-making in contemporary organizations. Students work in teams to develop group skills.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: BUS 111 or BUS 112 or BUS 114 or SPO 101 Recomm: PSY 101

BIO 205 Microbiology – 4 credits

An introduction to the biology of microorganisms with emphasis on the properties of microorganisms and their relationship to disease. Lab required.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: BIO 126 or BIO 194 or BIO 215 (BIO 195).

POL 205 American Foreign Policy – 3 credits

An introduction to America’s role in world affairs, especially since World War II. Attention is given to the underlying principles of American foreign relations; to the American foreign policy process; to the instruments of modern foreign policy; and to the contemporary foreign policy environment: Soviet-American relations, Western Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Latin America, and the Far East.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090), or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: POL 101

ENG 206 British Literature II – 3 credits

Readings in English literature from the late 17th century to the present.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 112, ENG 114 or ENG 116

EGR 206 Strength of Materials – 3 credits

Analysis of the stress and strain in structural members due to axial loads, torsion and bending.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: EGR 205 or permission of instructor

SOC 206 Sociology of Human Sexuality: Behaviors, Experiences, and Identities – 3 credits

A sociological perspective on human sexuality. The course provides an overview of historical and contemporary perspectives on sexuality. The course focuses on the construction of meaning of sexual behavior and experience, sexual orientation, and identity. Students study the impact of culture, religion, race, gender, and other social identities on sexuality. Students examine the inextricable nature of the meaning of sexuality and the socio-political milieu. The course investigates the significance of social policies on sexuality. Students learn about the relationship between the seemingly individual experience of sex and the larger social structures of society.

(Offered: Fall in odd numbered years)Prereq: SOC 101 or SOC 106

ENG 207 Creative Writing and Literature: Themes and Methods – 3 credits

Focuses on broad themes in creative writing and explores analytical as well as creative methods for responding to literature. Students explore a variety of creative genres, including drama, poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction, from many cultures and times. The course culminates in the production of original creative works.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 112, 114, or 116.

DAN 207 Ballet III – 3 credits

An intermediate course in classical ballet with emphasis on increased technical skill. Students learn principles of epaulement, placement, and multiple turns. Students may dance enpointe with instructor’s approval. The course presents longer, more intricate combinations and repertoire, the rich history and theory of ballet, and its widespread cultural impact through lectures, video viewing, outside of class reading and writing assignments, or performance attendance.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: DAN 108, or permission of instructor

ACC 207 Financial Accounting Systems and Procedures – 3 credits

The capstone course in financial accounting for students graduating with an Associate in Science in Accounting. Topics include: preparation of a manual accounting practice set utilizing common business forms, preparation of accounting workpapers for various accounts, payroll administration and reporting requirements, calculation of depreciation for both book and tax purposes, financial statement analysis, and ethics in accounting.

(Offered: Fall in even numbered years)Prereq: ACC 122 or ACC 152

POL 207 Politics of the Middle East – 3 credits

Examines the politics of the Middle East from a thematic perspective and explores issues such as the formation of the state of Israel, oil, terrorism and modernization. The course focuses on particular political systems such as Democracy, Theocracy and Monarchy and countries such as Israel, Iran, and Saudi Arabia. The course also examines the current dynamic within Islam.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: POL 105 or POL 205 or permission of the instructor

MUS 208 Jazz Improvisation – 3 credits

A beginning level course open to all instrumentalists and vocalists. This course serves as a stepping stone to the GCC Jazz Ensemble or other intermediate jazz groups. The class combines theoretical study and applied practice as means to explore harmony, rhythm, modes, scales, and the subtleties of musical conversation. One or two small jazz combos develop from within the class and provide the context for group practice.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: MUS 103 or permission of instructor; basic music reading skills; basic instrumental proficiency

ENG 208 Creative Writing and Literature: Studies in Genre – 3 credits

Explores creative writing through analysis of the writer’s craft. Students focus on one or more creative genres such as drama, poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction. Students engage with literary texts that present diverse worldviews. Students also conduct research and apply critical reading and writing strategies to their own analytical as well as creative work. The course culminates in the production of original creative works.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 112, 114, or 116

DAN 208 Ballet IV – 3 credits

A conclusion of the intermediate study of classical ballet. The course emphasizes performance skills. Students integrate technique with personal expression, and continue to learn and practice combinations and dances from the classical and contemporary repertoire. The course presents the rich history and theory of ballet, and its widespread cultural impact through lectures, video viewing, outside of class reading and writing assignments, or performance attendance.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: DAN 207

ACC 208 Introduction to Federal Income Taxes – 3 credits

Acquaints the student with the federal income tax system. The course emphasizes the basic concepts of income recognition, deductible business and non-business expenses, and special tax calculations. Students learn identification of the tax issues and proper research techniques for solving tax problems.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ACC 122 or ACC 152

SOC 208 Sociology of Gender – 3 credits

A focus on sociological dimensions of gender. This course examines the ways in which society and its institutions create, maintain and reproduce gender. Students investigate how gender categories are constructed and represented, and examine the consequences of these categories for the lives of individuals. Students learn about the significance of gender differences in the experiences of women, men, and transgender people on the micro and macro levels. The course investigates structural inequalities and the reproduction of those hierarchies in social processes and in everyday life, especially within the matrix of race, class, and gender. Contemporary research on gender is incorporated into the course.

(Offered: Spring in odd numbered years)Prereq: SOC 101 or SOC 106

EGR 209 Dynamics – 3 credits

A study of kinetics and kinematics of particles and rigid bodies including Newton’s laws, work-energy and impulse-momentum principles, laws of linear and angular momentum, conservation of momentum, and planar motion of rigid bodies.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: PHY 111, MAT 201, MAT 202 (or concurrent enrollment in MAT 202); Recomm: PHY 112, MAT 202, EGR 205

BUS 209 Principles of Marketing – 3 credits

The fundamentals of marketing for small and large businesses, introducing students to the marketing concept and the development of a marketing plan through hands-on preparation of market research, a situation analysis, segmentation, target market definition, positioning statement, marketing mix, and measurement plan while exploring fundamentals in case studies.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: BUS 111 or BUS 112 or BUS 114 or SPO 101 Recomm: PSY 101

PSY 209 Abnormal Psychology – 3 credits

A review of research methods, assessment procedures, the history of mental illness, and the major perspectives utilized in understanding mental illness. The course gives particular attention to the diagnostic system and categorization of conditions as developed by the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) as well as attention to current psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacological treatment interventions.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: PSY 101

ENG 210 Creative Nonfiction – 3 credits

Explores creative nonfiction essays and essay writing through extensive reading, individualized research, and writing workshops. Students develop familiarity with the variety and history of creative nonfiction. Students use multiple research methods, drafting approaches, and writing styles to explore topics of their choice. Students combine academic and creative writing strategies in new ways to explore and analyze their experiences and the world around them.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 112, 114, or 116

EMS 210 Paramedic Clinical – 2 credits

Provides student with practice of invasive skills and patient management under the supervision and direction of licensed hospital staff. Students attend one class meeting and produce a research paper based on clinical experiences. Students attend Pediatric Advanced Life Support seminar (off-campus) and receive Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) certification upon successful seminar completion.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: Successful completion of EMS 204. Concurrent registration in EMS 211.

EGR 210 Thermodynamics – 3 credits

The fundamentals of the science of thermodynamics including control volume analysis, conservation of mass and energy, the second law of thermodynamics, pure substance property relations, and applications of refrigeration and power systems.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: MAT 202, PHY 112; Recomm: MAT 203

ACC 210 Introduction to Computerized Accounting – 3 credits

An introduction to computerized accounting systems. The course provides the student with the knowledge and skills to bridge the gap between a manual accounting system and a computerized system. The course utilizes commonly available commercial accounting software.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ACC 152 or ACC 122 or concurrent enrollment in ACC 152 or ACC 122.

OLP 210 Wilderness First Responder – 4 credits

Trains students to the nationally recognized standards of emergency medical care in remote backcountry environments for certification in Wilderness First Responder (WFR), the industry standard for professional outdoor leaders, guides, camp counselors, rangers, and ski patrollers. Topics include environmental emergencies, soft tissue injuries, musculoskeletal injuries, medical emergencies, response and assessment, and rescue basics. The course includes classroom lessons and in-the-field hands-on experience and practice with simulated wilderness emergencies. Successful completion of the course will include WFR and CPR certifications. Special Requirement: This course involves moderate to high physical activity and the ability to be active and in the outdoors for hours at a time in a partially forested environment in winter conditions with sub-freezing temperatures. Off-campus field trips. All students must submit the OLP Health History and Physical Examination Attestation Form, completed and signed by a physician, verifying medical clearance for full participation. Students assume any travel and permit/pass costs associated with field trips. Students must be at least 16 years old to participate in this course. Those under 18 years of age require the written consent of a parent or guardian.

(Offered: Every January)Prereq: OLP 120 or permission of OLP Program Coordinator

PSY 210 Statistics for Psychology and the Social Sciences – 3 credits

An introduction to statistics for students interested in careers in psychology or related fields in social sciences. Students analyze the use of descriptive and inferential statistics for an understanding of qualitative and quantitative research strategies with application to psychological and social problems. Students use a computer based statistical package to analyze data. The course provides a basic background in the design of preliminary research strategies, research analysis and critique as well as provides an analytical approach to research articles in psychology and social sciences.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 112, 114 or 116; PSY 101; MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S. Recomm: MAT 096 (MAT 106) or MAT 096S.

SOC 210 Drugs and Society – 3 credits

A sociological examination of drugs in the United States. The course utilizes historical and current research to examine the social construction of drug use as a social problem. Students explore sociological theories for drug use and consider social reactions including public policy, criminal justice, education, and treatment. Students investigate the intersections between drug use and race, class, gender, and age. The course focuses on an overall understanding of the social factors contributing to drug use and the consequences for individuals, families, and society.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: SOC 101 or SOC 106 or PSY 101

EMS 211 Paramedic Fieldwork Internships I – 2 credits

Provides assignments with certified paramedics. Students perform pre-hospital treatment under supervision.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: Successful completion of EMS 204. Concurrent registration in EMS 210

EGR 211 Circuit Analysis I – 4 credits

Mathematical models for analog and digital circuit elements, basic circuit laws and network theorems applied to digital logic MOSFET gates, and to DC, transient, and steady-state response of first- and second-order circuits. Modeling circuit responses using differential equations. Lab includes circuit hardware and PSPICE simulation experiments.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: MAT 202, PHY 112

DAN 211 Contemporary/Modern Dance III – 3 credits

An intermediate course in contemporary/modern dance with increased emphasis on performance skills. The course presents specific techniques of modern dance pioneers, such as Graham, Humphrey-Weidman, Cunningham, and Taylor while incorporating influences of ballet and jazz and other dance styles. Students learn and execute movement sequences and repertory dances with attention to quality, styles, musicality and expressiveness. Students work on individual creativity and development of personal movement style. The course presents the history, theory and significance of contemporary/modern dance through lectures, video viewing, outside of class reading and writing assignments, or performance attendance.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: DAN 112, or permission of instructor

ENG 212 Graphic Novel – 3 credits

Explores the history and development of the graphic novel, a hybrid genre that combines visual and written textual elements. Students read, discuss, and write about graphic novels exploring issues of power, sexuality, race, gender, class, and identity.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 112, 114, or 116

EMS 212 Paramedic Fieldwork Internships II – 2 credits

A continuation of fieldwork assignments with certified paramedics. The course includes fieldwork rotations at affiliated EMS Services. The student is eligible to take the National Registry qualifying examinations upon successful completion of the course.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: EMS 211

EGR 212 Circuit Analysis II – 4 credits

Continuation of EGR 211. Analysis techniques for AC circuits, frequency response, resonance, Bode plots, phasor representation of sinusoidal steady-state systems, complex frequency domain, transfer functions. MOSFETs as amplifiers; operational amplifiers. Transformers, two-port networks, Fourier series. Lab includes circuit hardware and PSPICE simulation experiments.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: EGR 211 with a grade of C or better.

DAN 212 Contemporary/Modern Dance IV – 3 credits

A conclusion of the intermediate study of contemporary/modern dance with continued emphasis on the development of individual performance quality and style and the mastery of dance technique in the modern dance tradition. Students explore their individual movement ideas through choreography and improvisation. The course presents the history, theory and significance of contemporary/modern dance through lectures, video viewing, outside of class reading, writing, and choreography assignments, or performance attendance.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: DAN 211

PSY 212 Research Methods in Psychology – 3 credits

Examines research methods in psychology as well as the importance of understanding the methodology to conduct research. Topics include typical research methods in psychology, ethical issues, interpretation and communication of research methods and results.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: PSY 101; PSY 210 or MAT 114 or permission of Social Sciences department chair. Recomm: ENG 101, ENG 103, or ENG 105

EGR 213 Probability and Statistics for Scientists and Engineers – 4 credits

Probability and statistical theory, with primary emphasis on scientific and engineering applications. Students utilize techniques of collection, analysis, and interpretation of experimental data; explore probability modeling with discrete and continuous random variables; and analyze datasets by using computational software, such as R. Topics include: an examination of estimation and inference via confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, regression, correlation, and analysis of variance (ANOVA).

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: MAT 202

THE 213 Advanced Acting – 3 credits

Explores the actor’s use of improvisation, character development, motivation, and action through internal and external techniques. The course includes an in-depth concentration in training, theory, and practice in relation to character, scene and ensemble work. These studies are directly applied in workshops, rehearsal, and performance.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: THE 113

DAN 214 Tap Dance III – 3 credits

An intermediate course in tap dance with emphasis on the acquisition of performance skills, rhythmic accuracy and speed. Students learn traditional repertoire and time steps with their rhythmic breaks and explore improvisation. The course presents tap history, including its development as a fusion of African and European dance-music forms through lectures, video viewing, outside-of-class reading, and assigned performance attendance.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: DAN 115, or permission of instructor

HSV 215 Counseling Skills – 3 credits

The practical application of theories of helping. Students practice interviewing and counseling, and learn referral processes. The course introduces specialized counseling skills such as crisis prevention and intervention, addiction counseling, and group counseling. Digital recording is used for extensive demonstration and role-play.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: HSV 115

EDU 215 Student Teaching I – 6 credits

Provides teaching and learning experiences in early childhood programs with a focus on developing responsive relationships with children, observation, documentation, evaluation, curriculum development and lead teaching skills. The college does not guarantee placement in a teaching site for EDU 215. Student teaching placement depends upon agreement among the program site, the EDU faculty, and the student. NOTE: This is the first of two 150 – hour student teaching practicums required as part of the ECE Degree. A grade of C or better required for ECE degree. Special Requirement: Students need to arrange travel to and from teaching sites.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: Declared major in Early Childhood Education. EDU 101 with a C- or higher and a G.P.A. of 2.5 or higher and permission of the program coordinator. Recomm: EDU 201

CRJ 215 Field Experience – 3 credits

A field experience at an agency within the criminal justice system. The course integrates classroom theory with practical experience. Placement is at the discretion of the criminal justice faculty consistent with the policies of the cooperating agency.

(Offered: Spring in even numbered years)Prereq: CRJ 101 and 103, or permission of instructor

BIO 215 Human Anatomy and Physiology I – 4 credits

A first semester of a comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body, including biochemistry, cell anatomy and physiology, histology, the skeletal system, articulations, muscle anatomy and physiology, neurophysiology, the anatomy of the central and peripheral nervous systems, the anatomy and physiology of the special senses, and the neural integration. This is a Lab course that requires animal tissue dissections. NOTE: Students may receive credit for BIO 195 or BIO 215, but not for both.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: BIO 126 with a grade of C or better or a college level equivalent within the last ten years with a grade of C or better; ENG 090 and ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores; MAT 096 (MAT 106) or MAT 096S or MAT 014 or MAT 014S or satisfactory placement scores. Recomm: MAT 107

PSY 215 Theories of Personality – 3 credits

An exploration and application of the major schools of personality theory: psychoanalytic, trait, biological and evolutionary, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, relational, and sociocultural.

(Offered: Fall in even numbered years)Prereq: PSY 101. For HSV/LHS majors, HSV 101 is also required

EDU 216 Student Teaching II – 6 to credits

Provides teaching and learning experiences in early childhood programs with a focus on classroom environment design and materials, partnering with families, child assessment and accommodation, professional advocacy and lead teaching skills. Students complete a professional portfolio. The college does not guarantee placement in a teaching site for EDU 216. Student teaching placement depends upon agreement among the program site, the EDU faculty, and the student. NOTE: This is the second of two 150 – hour student teaching practicums required as part of the ECE Degree. A grade of C or better required for ECE degree. Special Requirement: Students need to arrange travel to and from teaching sites.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: EDU 215 with a grade of C or better and permission of program coordinator.

DAN 216 Middle Eastern Dance III – 3 credits

An intermediate course in Middle Eastern Dance. Students continue to practice the movements and rhythms of the dance, with an emphasis on personal expression, the development of individual style, musicality, improvisation and performance skills. Students learn extended dance sequences and group choreographies. The course incorporates the continued study of the complex history of the dance and its meaning and function in Middle Eastern and North African cultures, and in other areas that are home to people of Arabic heritage. Video viewing and outside of class reading and writing assignments or performance attendance augment in class practice.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: DAN 117, or permission of instructor

BIO 216 Human Anatomy and Physiology II – 4 credits

A second semester of a comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body, including endocrinology, blood, cardiovascular anatomy and physiology, lymphatic system, immunity, respiratory anatomy and physiology, digestive anatomy and physiology, metabolism, urinary anatomy and physiology, fluid dynamics, reproductive anatomy and physiology, genetics, and development. This is a Lab course that may require animal tissue dissection. NOTE: Students may receive credit for BIO 196 or BIO 216 but not for both.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: BIO 126 with a grade of C or better or a college level equivalent within the last ten years with a grade of C or better; one of the following: BIO 215 (BIO 195) or a grade of B or better within the past 5 years in BIO 194; ENG 090, and ENG 094 (COL 090) or satisfactory placement test scores; MAT 096 (MAT 106) or MAT 096S or MAT 014 or MAT 014S or satisfactory placement test scores. Recomm: MAT 107

OLP 216 Adventure Program Planning and Fieldwork II – 3 credits

Continuation of OLP 116. Topics include: managing logistics, organizing, conducting, and evaluating outdoor adventure programs with diverse populations. Students refine their instructional and shared leadership abilities. Students participate in field trips. Special Requirement: This course involves moderate to high physical activity and the ability to be active and in the outdoors for a full day in a remote, forested environment. Off-campus field trips. All students must submit the OLP Health History and Physical Examination Attestation Form, completed and signed by a physician, verifying medical clearance for full participation. Students assume any travel and permit/pass costs associated with field trips.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: OLP 111, OLP 120 or concurrent enrollment in OLP 120.

DAN 217 Middle Eastern Dance IV – 3 credits

A conclusion to the intermediate study of Middle Eastern Dance. Students continue to practice the movements, rhythms and choreography of the dance. Students refine personal performance style, based on informed choices and improvisational and creative responses to both contemporary and traditional Arabic or Arab-influenced music and rhythms. Students learn extended dance sequences, group choreographies for performance and to play zills (finger cymbals) as an accompaniment to the dance. The course incorporates the study of the history, meaning and function of Middle Eastern dance in the various cultures and countries. Video viewing and outside of class reading and writing assignments or performance attendance augment in class practice.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: DAN 216, or permission of instructor

PSY 217 Human Growth and Development – 3 credits

A survey of human physical, psychological, and social development from birth through death. Framework for the study of the individual’s cumulative, integrative growth experience. Theories of development and their applications.

(Offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer)Prereq: PSY 101 or permission of instructor

HIS 218 Women and Gender in the American West to 1920 CE – 3 credits

An exploration of the history of gendered experiences, roles, and influences, with emphasis on women in the American West before and after European and American expansion. Students concentrate on the gendered interface of Native, European, African, Middle Eastern, and Asian persons west of the Mississippi River prior to the closing of the Western Frontier. Further, students examine the unique western landscape and its influence on gender roles and experiences.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 101 Recomm: HIS 105, HIS 106, or HIS 131

HIS 219 Legal History of American Civil Rights – 3 credits

An interdisciplinary approach to examining historical relationships between people and the law in the United States. This course explores crucial themes in civil rights including the changing role of the federal government in defining and protecting the rights of individuals and groups; the historical relationship of the U.S. legal system to minority groups, Indigenous populations, women, immigrants, people with disabilities, and LGBT+ groups. Students examine the development of federalism and the evolution of the separation of powers as these principles of political organization relate to civil rights throughout the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 101, ENG 103, or ENG 105; and HIS 106 RECOMM: POL 101

CRJ 219 Constitutional Criminal Procedure – 3 credits

Examines general principles of criminal procedure contained in the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments of the U.S. Constitution, focusing on governmental power and the restrictions on it in the enforcement of state and federal criminal law.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: CRJ 101, 103, or permission of instructor. Recomm: POL 101, POL 203, or CRJ 121

MUS 220 Songwriting – 3 credits

A practical exploration of techniques for writing songs in various classic genres including the music of George Gershwin, Chuck Berry, the Beatles, Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Ani DiFranco, and others. The course ties together aspects of music theory, music history, improvisation, collaboration, composition, and performance. The course also covers songwriting industry topics such as recording production and copyright law.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: MUS 103 or permission of instructor or Program Coordinator; basic proficiency in chordal accompaniment on guitar or piano

BIO 220 Foundations of Ecology – 4 credits

The study of the complex inter-relatedness of organisms and the environment. Topics include the study of the individual, population, community, ecosystem and global levels of ecology with emphasis on conservation and sustainability of natural resources. Students engage the scientific method through laboratory experiences in forest, field, stream and pond habitats. NOTE: Students may receive credit for BIO 220 or BIO 103, but not for both. Special Requirement: Field trips. Students assume any travel costs.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 090, ENG 094 (COL 090), MAT 107 or concurrent enrollment in MAT 107; 2 lab sciences: either 2 from Group A or 1 from Group A and 1 from Group B. Group A: BIO 102, BIO 120, BIO 126, BIO 127, GEO 102, GEO 204. Group B: BIO 104, BIO 122, BIO 130 and BIO 130L, BIO 205, CHE 111, GEO 203, PHY 101, PHY 111, PHY 113, SCI 120, SCI 138. Recomm: ENG 101 and MAT 107

PSY 220 Social Psychology – 3 credits

An introduction to the scientific study of how individuals think, feel, perceive, and behave in a social context. The course explores the intersections of psychology and sociology including the self, social cognition, perception, emotions, attitudes, pro-social and anti-social behavior, attraction, prejudice, and group behavior. The course introduces theoretical perspectives and research on individual behavior within a social context. NOTE: Students may receive credit for PSY 220 or SOC 220, but not for both.

(Offered: Spring in even numbered years)Prereq: SOC 101 or PSY 101; Recomm: SOC 101 and PSY 101; ENG 101, 103, or 105

SOC 220 Social Psychology – 3 credits

An introduction to the scientific study of how individuals think, feel, perceive, and behave in a social context. The course explores the intersections of psychology and sociology including the self, social cognition, perception, emotions, attitudes, pro-social and anti-social behavior, attraction, prejudice, and group behavior. The course introduces theoretical perspectives and research on individual behavior within a social context. NOTE: Students may receive credit for PSY 220 or SOC 220, but not for both.

(Offered: Spring in even numbered years)Prereq: SOC 101 or PSY 101; Recomm: SOC 101 and PSY 101; ENG 101, 103, or 105

ENG 221 Shakespeare – 3 credits

A critical study of a selected group of plays by Shakespeare, approached by theme. The course will also give some attention to contemporary presentations or adaptations.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 112, 114, or 116

REE 221 Photovoltaic (Solar Electric) Installation – 3 credits

An examination of the practical skills needed to install utility-connected and off-grid Photovoltaic (PV) systems. Topics include the study of electric load analysis, system and component design and sizing, system siting, shading, electrical and mechanical system configuration, and safety and electrical and building code compliance supplemented with hands-on system installation. Successful completion of this course enables the student to sit for the NABCEP (North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners) PV Entry Level Certificate. With additional education, training and installation experience, this certificate can lead to becoming a NABCEP Certified PV Solar Installer. In Massachusetts, only licensed electricians may install PV systems. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 221 or REE 221, but not for both. Special Requirement: Field trips required.

(Offered: Every Other Spring)Prereq: EGT 112 (SCI 112) and REE 121 (SCI 121).

MUS 222 Audio Recording and Production II – 3 credits

Provides intermediate level training in computer based audio recording, editing, and mixing. The course focuses on pre-production, production, and post-production aspects of musical sound recordings and does so from the viewpoint of understanding the recording studio as a music composition tool. The course advances student knowledge of Pro Tools and other recording software and hardware. Special Requirement: Students are required to own studio reference headphones and one dedicated 1 Tb Mac compatible external hard drive.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: MUS 154 (MUS 221) Recomm: MUS 138

MUS 223 Electronic Music Composition – 3 credits

An introduction to basic techniques in creating electronic music. Students use Ableton Live software to create simple techno and ambient loops and advance to more experimental and complex electronic music creation. Students learn fundamentals of music creation processes for game design, sound design, video and film scoring, and multi-media production. Special Requirement: Students are required to own studio reference headphones and one dedicated 1 Tb Mac Compatible external hard drive.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: MUS 154 (MUS 221) or permission of department chair.

EGR 223 Introduction to Material Science – 3 credits

A study of the fundamental characteristics of engineering materials including metals, ceramics, polymers and composites. Topics include a thorough analysis of the response of crystalline materials to mechanical stress and thermal treatment and the selection of materials for mechanical properties. The course emphasizes the relationship between microstructure and mechanical behavior of materials.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: CHE 111, PHY 112

MUS 224 Independent Music Production Project – 3 credits

For advanced music production students to pursue independent creative work using the music technology equipment and spaces in the Music Department. Students construct an instructor approved formal project proposal to present to the class and complete through individual and collaborative work. The class meets weekly to discuss and exchange constructive critique on developing projects. Students share completed final projects in a formal presentation, with discussion and review by peer students, music faculty, and others. Special Requirement: Students are required to own studio reference headphones and a dedicated 1 Tb Mac compatible external hard drive.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: MUS 138, MUS 153, MUS 154 (MUS 221), MUS 222 or concurrent enrollment in MUS 222), and MUS 223 or concurrent enrollment in MUS 223. Recomm: MUS 220 and MUS 139

BUS 224 Business Communications – 3 credits

An introduction to best practices in business communication strategies. Topics include planning, organizing, composing and delivering persuasive oral and written business communications in various modes and media to fulfill the needs of professional audiences. Students practice effective grammar mechanics while understanding job search techniques, and preparing cover letters, resumes, and professional portfolios for individualized career goals.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 101, 103, or 105

PSY 225 Psychology of Women and Gender – 3 credits

An exploration of current and historical understandings of the psychology of women and gender. Topics include psychological, biological, and social explanations of women’s psychology and development and critical examination of research on gender differences and similarities. The course introduces the student to a general overview of what psychologists have learned about the role of gender in people’s daily lives and explores in depth psychological research and theory on gender-related topics of interest.

(Offered: Fall in odd numbered years)Prereq: PSY 101 or permission of instructor. Recomm: ENG 101, ENG 103 or ENG 105.

THE 225 Directing-Theory and Practice – 4 credits

An introduction to the skills of directing with an emphasis on the elements of play production. The student studies the concepts/requirements necessary to mount a full theatrical production. The student chooses, analyzes, casts, and directs for performance a one-act instructor approved play. This one-act play is a minimum of 45 minutes performance time and is presented for the GCC community in the Sloan Theater at semester’s end. NOTE: Students may receive credit for either THE 224 or THE 225, but not for both.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ENG 112, 114, or 116, and either THE 101, 113, 105, or permission of the instructor

REE 227 Sustainable Design and Green Building Practices – 3 credits

An investigation into sustainable design and green building techniques and how they may be synthesized to best fit a specific construction project. Students expand upon and utilize concepts learned in REE 127 (SCI 127), Introduction to Sustainable Design and Green Building. Students work through a controlled process of analysis and design to produce drawings and models of their personal green building project. Topics include building form, orientation and site considerations, conservation measures, energy modeling, heating system and fuel choices, renewable energy systems, material choices, construction budget, and mortgage and payback considerations. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 227 or REE 227, but not for both. Special Requirement: Field trips required.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: REE 127 (SCI 127) or permission of instructor, and MAT 095 (MAT 105) or MAT 095S.

ENG 228 Queer Literature – 3 credits

A study of various genres and periods of literary texts by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender writers. The course includes lectures and classroom discussions on the texts and their cultural and historical contexts. Students discuss how the texts relate to expressions of, and arguments about, being queer in a predominantly heterosexual world. Readings also address more general issues of marginalization, such as those involving gender, race, class, and age. The course is appropriate for any student interested in the way literature expresses human difference.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 112, 114, or 116

REE 228 Photovoltaic Technical Sales and Marketing – 3 credits

An advanced course in Photovoltaic Sales and Marketing for those already familiar with photovoltaic technology and looking to develop and demonstrate their expertise in siting, design, analysis of customer needs, and performance analysis of photovoltaic systems. Topics include costs, savings, government incentives, and financing options for both ownership and Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) models. Students prepare proposals based on specific customer locations and needs. The course closely aligns with the NABCEP (North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners) task analysis for their industry certification in Photovoltaic Technical Sales, and students should seek such certification after completion of the course and additional NABCEP requirements. NOTE: Students may receive credit for SCI 228 or REE 228, but not for both. Special Requirement: Field trips; students assume any travel costs.

(Offered: Every Other Spring)Prereq: EGT 112 (SCI 112), REE 121 (SCI 121); REE 221 (SCI 221) or concurrent enrollment in REE 221 or permission of instructor. Recomm: MAT 096 (MAT 106) or MAT 096S.

ENG 229 Gothic Literature – 3 credits

A critical and analytical study of the gothic tradition in both classic and modern supernatural literature, with some attention to film. Students examine the significance of the supernatural horror tale in its larger literary, social, and cultural context.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 112, 114, or 116.

MUS 230 Applied Music – 2 credits

Individual music lessons open to all students of any level or interest. Individual lessons meet for one hour per week for 12 weeks. Additional group instruction meetings happen twice during the semester at times to be determined by instructor. Students and instructors arrange regular meeting times on an individual basis. Music majors must take MUS 230 on a primary instrument for four semesters. NOTE: There is a charge for a studio instructor fee in addition to tuition. Students may repeat this course without limit but may enroll in not more than one section in a single semester. See college course catalog for details.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: None. Recomm: concurrent enrollment in MUS 231

BIO 230 Introduction to Field Research Methods and Analysis – 2 credits

A field-based introduction to ecological research methods and practice. Students participate in experimental design, data collection and analysis, and scientific communication through an immersive field research experience (e.g. terrestrial salamander ecology, invasive species management, ecology of vernal pool ecosystems). Students engage the primary literature and practice scientific communication through keeping a field journal and giving a final poster presentation. Students employ basic field techniques, discuss research ethics, and prepare for future ecological research and study. Special Requirement: Students must possess physical ability to traverse uneven landscapes. This class includes extensive fieldwork. Some scheduled class time will be used for field research with additional hours arranged individually. Interested students should meet with the instructor before registering to discuss the logistics of this course. Field trips. Students assume any travel costs.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: BIO 102, BIO 104, BIO 120, BIO 126, or BIO 127; ENG 101; MAT 096 (MAT 106) or MAT 096S or satisfactory placement test scores.

OLP 230 Rock Climbing Instructor – 3 credits

Introduces the Professional Climbing Instructors Association (PCIA) instructor competencies and curriculum for institutional top rope rock climbing certification. Topics include technical proficiency, selection of equipment, safety systems, site and group management, leadership and teaching approaches, curriculum development, and basic rock rescue. Students participate in local and regional fieldtrips. Special Requirement: This course involves moderate to high physical activity and the ability to be active and in the outdoors for a full day in a remote, forested environment. Off-campus field trips. All students must submit the OLP Health History and Physical Examination Attestation Form, completed and signed by a physician, verifying medical clearance for full participation. Students assume any travel and permit/pass costs associated with field trips.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: OLP 111 or permission of OLP Program Coordinator. Recomm: Wilderness First Responder certification preferred. Prior experience leading groups on rock climbing experiences preferred.

MUS 231 Recital Participation – 0 credits

Fulfills one-fourth of recital attendance and performance requirement for music majors. Students must attend and perform in student recital events scheduled for the end of the semester. With direction from applied music instructors and the Music Program Coordinator, students are expected to prepare and perform one or more musical pieces in solo, duo, or group settings. NOTE: Students may repeat this course without limit.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: Non-music majors need permission of Music Program Coordinator; concurrent enrollment in MUS 230 for music majors

OLP 231 River Canoe Instructor – 3 credits

Introduces American Canoe Association (ACA) instructor competencies and curriculum for certification in canoe touring and river canoe courses. Topics include hazard assessment and safety, technical knowledge and skills development, decision-making and judgement, instructional and leadership abilities in a river environment. This course progresses from flatwater review through moving and whitewater up to class II-III. Students participate in Advanced Swift Water Rescue training. Students participate in regional field trips to area waterways. Special Requirement: This course involves moderate to high physical activity, immersion in cold water, and the ability to swim in a river current and be active and in the outdoors for a full day in a remote, forested environment. Off-campus field trips. All students must submit the OLP Health History and Physical Examination Attestation Form, completed and signed by a physician, verifying medical clearance for full participation. Students assume any travel and permit/pass costs associated with field trips.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: OLP 111 or permission of OLP Program Coordinator Recomm: Wilderness First Responder certification preferred. Prior experience leading groups on river paddling experiences preferred.

PSY 233 Child Behavior and Development – 3 credits

Focuses on the development of the child from conception to adolescence. The concept of development is explored in depth and all aspects of the developing child are considered: social, emotional, physical, verbal, intellectual, and creative. Major theories of child development are reviewed. Research in child development is studied with particular attention paid to naturalistic observation.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: PSY 101 or permission of instructor

OLP 234 Challenge Course Practitioner – 3 credits

Introduces Association for Challenge Course Technology (ACCT) low and high ropes course competencies and curriculum for certification. Topics include adventure foundations, facilitation and technical skills, risk management, program design, delivery and evaluation. Students participate in regional field trips. Special Requirement: This course involves moderate to high physical activity and the ability to be active and in the outdoors for a full day in a remote, forested environment. Off-campus field trips. All students must submit the OLP Health History and Physical Examination Attestation Form, completed and signed by a physician, verifying medical clearance for full participation. Students assume any travel and permit/pass costs associated with field trips.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: OLP 111 or permission of OLP Program Coordinator. Recomm: Wilderness First Responder certification preferred. Prior experience leading groups on climbing experiences preferred.

ART 235 Figure Drawing – 3 credits

An introduction to figure drawing. This course emphasizes observational drawing skills through an investigation of the human form, its underlying anatomical structure, and its spatial environment. The course focuses on drawing from the model with emphasis on gesture, proportion, foreshortening, and composition.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ART 132

ART 236 Advanced Drawing I – 3 credits

Approaches drawing as a personalized form of expression and investigation. Students work in series to develop a body of work. Possibilities include figurative, life drawing, abstraction, and conceptual.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ART 123 and ART 235

ART 237 Advanced Drawing II – 3 credits

Continuation of ART 236, Advanced Drawing I. Students discuss and analyze the drawing medium in greater depth than in previous coursework and go on to create an individualized drawing portfolio demonstrating a critical understanding of the issues inherent in developing a cohesive body of work.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ART 236

OLP 238 Coastal Kayak Instructor – 4 credits

Introduces American Canoe Association (ACA) instructor competencies and curriculum for certification in kayak touring and coastal kayaking courses. Topics include hazard assessment and safety, technical skills development, technical knowledge, decision-making and judgment, and instructional and leadership abilities in a coastal environment, including proficiency in rescues. Students participate in pool sessions. Students participate in local and regional fieldtrips, including a 5-day coastal kayaking expedition. Special Requirement: This course involves moderate to high physical activity, immersion in cold water, and the ability to swim in an ocean current and be active and in the outdoors for multiple days and nights in a remote, forested environment. Minimum age requirement 18 years of age for courses involving overnight stays. Off-campus field trips. All students must submit the OLP Health History and Physical Examination Attestation Form, completed and signed by a physician, verifying medical clearance for full participation. Students assume any travel and permit/pass costs associated with field trips.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: OLP 111 or permission of OLP Program Coordinator Recomm: Wilderness First Responder certification preferred. Prior experience leading groups on paddling experiences preferred.

OLP 239 Backcountry Travel Instructor II – 4 credits

Continuation of OLP 143. Students design, execute and evaluate a winter backcountry ski and snowshoe expedition and demonstrate core competencies for effective leadership. Topics include advanced planning, winter navigation, snow/ice terrain, sled travel, snow shelters, cold-weather food management, and wilderness medical considerations. Students participate in field trips. Special Requirement: This course involves moderate to high physical activity and the ability to be active and in the outdoors for 8 days and nights in a remote, forested environment in mid-winter conditions with sub-zero temperatures. Minimum age requirement 18 years for courses involving overnight stays. Off-campus field trips. All students must submit the OLP Health History and Physical Examination Attestation Form, completed and signed by a physician, verifying medical clearance for full participation. Students assume any travel and permit/pass costs associated with field trips.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: OLP 143

ENG 241 Survey of Children’s Literature – 3 credits

Wide reading of classic and current children’s literature, including the history and development of the genre. This course examines criteria for judging children’s books and reviews classroom techniques in early childhood education.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ENG 112, 114, or 116

ART 241 Painting – 3 credits

Introduces the medium and craft of painting. The course includes study in the mixing and application of color, construction of canvases and other painting supports. The course emphasizes composition and image development.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ART 123 and ART 132

ART 242 Painting and Drawing I – 3 credits

An investigation of interrelationships of painting and drawing. Students work through a series of problems addressing formal and conceptual issues. The course emphasizes the development of an individual, cohesive, body of work.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ART 241

ENG 243 Modern Poetry – 3 credits

An examination of modern poetry with an emphasis on interpretation and analysis of voice, language, sound, and form. This course provides an in-depth study of some major innovators as well as a study of other contemporary poets.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 112, 114, or 116

CIS 243 JavaScript – 3 credits

An introduction to the fundamental applications of the JavaScript scripting language for the World Wide Web. Students modify existing functions and write their own to create user interfaces, animation, and interactive slideshows through extensive project-based assignments. The course includes study in the integration of JQuery libraries and Ajax.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: CIS 150 or CIS 151

ART 243 Painting and Drawing II – 3 credits

A continuation of ART 242, Painting and Drawing I, with emphasis on the development of an individual, cohesive, portfolio of work.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ART 242

ENG 244 Science Fiction: Themes and Contexts – 3 credits

Examines science fiction from diverse cultural perspectives. Students explore critical and social contexts that inform science fiction, gain an understanding of its history and development as a genre, and analyze its contributions to contemporary culture as well as its place within the arts. The course focuses on literature, although students may also study science fiction in multiple media such as film, television, and the visual arts. Students write critical essays and have the opportunity to produce creative works of their own.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 112, 114, or 116; Recomm: A college-level science or philosophy course.

CIS 245 Advanced Database Programming – 3 credits

A continuation of CIS 145, Relational Database Design and Application. The student begins with advanced macro design, then is introduced to Access Basic (a 4GL version of Microsoft Visual Basic for Windows) in conjunction with built-in database tools. This is used by the student to create custom applications using the Microsoft Access relational database. Students complete a database term project.

(Offered: Spring in even numbered years)Prereq: CIS 145

ENG 247 Women in Literature I – 3 credits

A study of works by women writers through the 19th century. Students discuss literature in various genres within the historical and social context of the times, in relation to early literary movements and from the perspective of a unique female literary tradition.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 112, 114, or 116

ART 247 Painting: On Location and in the Studio – 3 credits

An exploration of the craft of painting with an emphasis on methods, materials and the construction of the observed image. Students work in outdoor locations and within the studio to develop connections between observed space and visual memory. This course builds on technical skills acquired in ART 241. Special Requirement: Students must attend class meetings at off-campus locations, assume any travel costs, and make arrangements for transportation.

(Offered: Every Summer)Prereq: ART 241

MUS 248 Poetics of Song Creation – 3 credits

Provides advanced training and practice in collaborative songwriting, performance, and music production. Students work in groups to compose songs, arrange songs, record songs, and rehearse songs for performance. The course builds on prerequisite studies in creative musicianship processes and it specifically advances student knowledge and abilities for integrating songwriting, arrangement/performance creation, and recorded track creation. Students present final versions of original recorded work in a group setting and also perform their original works in an end of semester concert. Special Requirement: Students are required to own studio reference headphones and one dedicated 1 Tb Mac compatible external hard drive.

(Offered: Spring in odd numbered years)Prereq: MUS 138 and MUS 139 and MUS 220 and MUS 154 (MUS 221) Recomm: Two semesters of MUS 138 and MUS 139; MUS 222

ENG 248 Women in Literature II – 3 credits

A study of poetry, short fiction, novels, and drama that presents the richness of diversity in the work of women writers from the 20th century to the present. Students focus on the voice of the writer and her use of literary technique as she explores important themes in women’s lives.

(Offered: Every Other Spring)Prereq: ENG 112, 114, or 116

CIS 251 Java Programming – 4 credits

A study of computer programming using the Java language. The course emphasizes proper programming techniques and structure, and industrial practices. Teaching methodology includes lab activities, and problem solving, both individually and in small groups. Students complete extensive programming assignments.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: CIS 150 or permission of instructor.

ART 251 Intermediate Photography I – 3 credits

Emphasizes the range of possibilities in photography, including film, digital, and the exploration of experimental processes. Students explore their interests through a project orientation and discuss issues and methodologies that concern the contemporary photographer.

(Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring)Prereq: ART 151 Recomm: ART 152

FST 252 Strategy and Tactics – 3 credits

Provides principles of fire ground control through utilization of personnel, equipment, and extinguishing agents. NOTE: Students may receive credit for FST 252 or FST 203, but not for both.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: FST 151 and FST 155 or permission of instructor or program coordinator. Recomm: FST 159 or some experience with protection systems.

CIS 252 C++ Programming – 3 credits

A study of computer programming using the C++ language. The course emphasizes proper programming techniques and structure, and industrial practices. Teaching methodology includes lab activities and problem solving, both individually and in small groups. Students complete extensive programming assignments.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: CIS 150 or status of a second year engineering student

ART 252 Intermediate Photography II – 3 credits

Continuation of ART 251 Intermediate Photography I. Students discuss and analyze the photographic image in greater depth than in previous coursework and go on to create an individualized photography portfolio demonstrating a critical understanding of the issues inherent in developing a cohesive body of work. Special Requirement: Students must provide their own camera with shutter speed and f-stop controls.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ART 251

FST 253 Fire Investigation I – 3 credits

Provides the fundamentals and technical knowledge needed for proper fire scene interpretations, including recognizing and conducting origin and cause, preservation of evidence and documentation, scene security, motives of the fire setter, and types of fire causes. NOTE: Students may receive credit for FST 253 or FST 205, but not for both.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: FST 151 and FST 155 or permission of instructor or program coordinator.

ENG 253 Valley/American Literature – 3 credits

A critical study of American literature from the Puritan period to the present with focus on the significant achievements of Valley writers. This course explores the impact of the geographical, social, and cultural environment of the Pioneer Valley on their works. Students study Jonathan Edwards, Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Robert Frost, Archibald MacLeish, and other writers.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 112, 114, or 116

FST 254 Legal Aspects of Emergency Services – 3 credits

Addresses the Federal, State, and local laws that regulate emergency services and include a review of national standards, regulations, and consensus standards. NOTE: Students may receive credit for FST 254 or FST 206, but not for both.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: FST 151 or permission of instructor or program coordinator.

CIS 254 Data Structures – 4 credits

Introduces and develops methods for designing and implementing abstract data types, using the Java programming language. The main focus is on how to build and encapsulate data objects and their associated operations. Specific topics include linked structures, recursive structures and algorithms, binary trees, balanced trees, and hash tables. Special Requirement: Enrollment requires permission of a Business or an Engineering Program Chair.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: CIS 251 and MAT 107

FRE 255 French Film and Language I – 3 credits

The intermediate study of French through francophone films. The course emphasizes the acquisition of language functions, vocabulary, idioms, and cultures through the study of francophone films. Students study representative French language films, selected from films by Renoir, Godard, Pouliot, Ocelot, Chabrol and Jugnot. These are the subject of class discussions, dramatizations and oral and written assignments. Students practice listening comprehension, study idiomatic speech, analyze cultural content and examine historical contexts. The instructor and the students conduct the class in French. NOTE: This course and FRE 257 are not sequential; they may be taken in either order.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: FRE 202 or equivalent

ART 255 Intermediate Video – 3 credits

An exploration of video as a medium for artistic expression. Students strengthen their conceptual, critical, technical and observational skills through the creation of a series of short video works that explore a particular theme. Special Requirement: Students are expected to provide their own high definition digital video camera.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ART 155; ART 123 or permissions of the instructor

SPA 255 Spanish Film and Language I – 3 credits

The intermediate study of Spanish through Spanish language films. The course emphasizes the acquisition of language functions, vocabulary, idioms, and cultures through an introduction to cinema from the Spanish-speaking world. Students study representative Spanish language films, selected from films by Schroeder, Gutirrez Alea, Gonzlez Irritu, Almodovar, Buuel, and Puenzo. These are the subject of class discussions, dramatizations and oral and written assignments. Students practice listening comprehension, study idiomatic speech, analyze cultural content and examine historical contexts. The instructor and the students conduct the class in Spanish. NOTE: This course and SPA 257 are not sequential; they may be taken in either order.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: SPA 202 or equivalent

FRE 256 French Reading for Communication I – 3 credits

Emphasizes continued acquisition of language functions, vocabulary, idioms, and cultures through an introduction to authentic francophone texts. Students study a representative selection of French readings. These readings are the subject of class discussions, dramatizations and oral and written assignments. Students practice reading comprehension, study idiomatic speech, analyze cultural content and examine historical contexts within the selected readings. The instructor and the students conduct the class in French.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: FRE 202 or equivalent.

ENG 256 Modern Global Literature – 3 credits

Focuses on universal themes, drawn from various modern national and transnational literatures, such as: nature, childhood, gender, class, ethnicity, conflict, alienation, assimilation, identity, and self-image. Students analyze literature from diverse cultural perspectives, exploring works beyond the familiar boundaries of the Euro-American tradition. This course may include readings from Asia, Africa, Oceania, the Americas and Europe. NOTE: Students may receive credit for ENG 256 or ENG 240, Modern Global Literature offered Fall 2015, but not for both.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 112, ENG 114, or ENG 116

ART 256 Intermediate Video II – 3 credits

A continuation of ART 255, Intermediate Video. Students produce a series of thematically linked video works that display an increased level of critical thinking and technical achievement and go on to develop a video portfolio comprised of previous and new work. Students refine and expand their understanding of, and ability to create, video for personal artistic expression. Special Requirement: Students are expected to provide their own high definition digital video camera.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ART 255 or permission of Art department chair

FRE 257 French Film and Language II – 3 credits

The intermediate study of French through francophone films. The course emphasizes the acquisition of language functions, vocabulary, idioms, and cultures through the study of francophone films. Students study representative French language films, selected from films by Cocteau, Truffaut, Berri, Leconte, Denis and Jeunet. These are the subject of class discussions, dramatizations and oral and written assignments. Students practice listening comprehension, study idiomatic speech, analyze cultural content and examine historical contexts. The instructor and the students conduct the class in French. NOTE: This course and FRE 255 are not sequential; they may be taken in either order.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: FRE 202 or equivalent

SPA 257 Spanish Film and Language II – 3 credits

The intermediate study of Spanish through Spanish language films. The course emphasizes the acquisition of language functions, vocabulary, idioms, and cultures through an introduction to cinema from the Spanish-speaking world. Students study representative Spanish language films, selected from films by Cuerda, Bielinsky, Salles, Marston, Gutirrez Alea, and Sayles. These are the subject of class discussions, dramatizations and oral and written assignments. Students practice listening comprehension, study idiomatic speech, analyze cultural content and examine historical contexts. The instructor and the students conduct the class in Spanish. NOTE: This course and SPA 255 are not sequential; they may be taken in either order.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: SPA 202 or equivalent

ART 258 Illustration – 3 credits

An introduction to the field of illustration. The course emphasizes the development of conceptual problem-solving abilities, technical skills, self-expression and personal style. Students work through a series of problems aimed at developing their strength in these areas.

(Offered: Fall in odd numbered years)Prereq: ART 123 and ART 132

ENG 261 The Short Story – 3 credits

A survey of the short story as a literary genre from its beginnings in the early 19th century to the present time with emphasis on interpretation and analysis, characters in conflict, point of view, and symbolism.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 112, 114, or 116

ART 263 Web Site Design – 3 credits

An introduction to the languages, tools, methods, and philosophies relative to planning, designing, creating, and publishing web sites. Students design and develop their own web sites using industry-standard software.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: ART 161; ART 123 or permission of the instructor

ENG 270 Literature and the Environment – 3 credits

Examines the relationship between literature and the environment. Students read works of literature drawn from multiple genres, times and cultures and analyze how they depict or frame questions about the relationship between humans and the natural world as well as the built environment. Students also learn about and apply critical approaches from ecocriticism, urban and regional studies, and ecofeminism while writing analytical essays on specific texts and producing creative works.

(Offered: Periodically)Prereq: ENG 112, 114, or 116; Recomm: Any EVS or BIO course

MAC 271 Medical Assistant Practicum – 4 credits

Provides students with fieldwork, competency training, and skill-building through directed and closely supervised participation in a mixed medical clinical and office setting. Students practice their acquired skills through professionally supervised individual and/or group-focused opportunities for involvement. Students write weekly journal entries documenting and discussing the experience, followed by a final reflective paper at the end of the semester. In addition to the 180 hours of supervised, unpaid, clinical practice at a work site, students meet for a total of 30 lab hours to discuss their practicum experience and to prepare for a national certification exam. Special Requirement: Enrollment requires permission of the MAC program coordinator. Refer to the MAC program page in the catalog for additional requirements which include time-sensitive additional health requirements, CPR certification, costs associated with these, and costs for transportation to and from the work site. The required CPR certification that must be kept current is the American Heart Association (AHA) Basic Life Support (BLS) Health Care Provider.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: MAC 101, MAC 103, MAC 105, MAC 111, MAC 113, MAC 114, MAC 115, MAC 120, MOM 110; and one of the following with a C or better within the last 5 years: MAC 112 or BIO 194 or BIO 216 (BIO 196).

HSV 271 Practicum in Human Services – 4 credits

Provides students with field work in competency training and skill building through directed, closely-supervised involvement in a human service agency. Students practice their acquired skills through professionally supervised individual and/or group focused involvement. In addition to the fieldwork, students meet each week for two hours to discuss practicum experiences.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: HSV 215 (or concurrent enrollment)

HSV 272 Practicum in Addiction Studies II – 4 credits

The second of two practicum experiences in the Addiction Studies Certificate program. Students participate in a 150-hour practicum experience in a community agency that provides services and support to individuals with substance use disorders. Students utilize the 12 core functions of a licensed alcohol and drug counselor (LADC). Students apply the cumulative knowledge and skills acquired in the foundational courses. Students demonstrate professional conduct and appropriate work habits. Students participate in a 2-hour a week seminar experience for additional personal/professional support, supervision, feedback and exploration of field-related experiences. The course provides the opportunity to enhance/augment knowledge and skills related to working with clients with a substance use disorder. The course emphasizes confidentiality, professionalism, ethical principles and conduct. Placement in an agency site for HSV 272 is not guaranteed and depends upon agreement among the site, the HSV faculty, and the student. Special Requirement: This course must be completed with a C or better to count towards the Addiction Studies Certificate. Students assume travel costs to agency site.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: HSV 107, HSV 115, HSV 168, HSV 172 with a grade of C or better, and HSV 215 or concurrent enrollment in HSV 215, must be an Addiction Studies Certificate major or a Liberal Arts Human Services Option major, and permission of the Human Services program coordinator.

PSY 277 Psychology of Death and Dying – 3 credits

Designed to be both experiential and didactic, this course enhances students’ understanding of death and dying processes both personally and professionally. Topics covered include cultural attitudes toward death and dying, origins of death anxiety, processes involved in dying, grieving and mourning, children and death, the helping relationship and the caregiver, suicide, euthanasia, burial and cremation, organ and body donations, and community resources.

(Offered: Spring in odd numbered years)Prereq: PSY 101 or permission of instructor

CIS 280 Network Server Administration – 3 credits

Provides instruction in the installation, configuration, and management of a local area network server using current industry server software. Topics include installation of software, configuration of software and common services, protection of data, client requirements and setup, setting up groups and users, managing and securing access to server files, remote access, and other topics. Students complete extensive hands-on lab activities and homework.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: CIS 180

ART 280 Creative Coding – 3 credits

An introduction to coding for artists. Topics include programming motion, interactivity, sound, video, graphics and the study of the history of code-based art. Students complete a body of work exploring conceptual and visual ideas.

(Offered: Spring in even numbered years)Prereq: ART 161 Recomm: MAT 095

ART 281 Computer Arts I – 3 credits

Explores the computer as a medium for the creation of works of art. Students create a series of works that investigate different approaches to the medium with the end goal of creating a Computer Arts portfolio. The instructor reviews different software and techniques each semester.

(Offered: Spring in odd numbered years)Prereq: ART 161 and ART 121 or permissions of the Department Chair

ART 282 Computer Arts II – 3 credits

Explores the computer as a medium for the creation of works of arts. Students continue to create a series of works that investigate different approaches to the medium with the end goal of creating an advanced Computer Arts portfolio. The instructor reviews different software and techniques each semester.

(Offered: Every Fall)Prereq: ART 281

CIS 283 Linux – 3 to credits

Provides a basic working knowledge of the Linux operating system and an understanding of the Unix environment. Topics include installing Linux as a server, configuring Linux, managing users, the UNIX command line, file systems, security, Internet services (DNS, HTTP, SMTP, POP, SSH), and Intranet services (NFS, DHCP). Students set up, debug, and troubleshoot actual workstation installations.

(Offered: Fall in even numbered years)Prereq: CIS 180 or permission of instructor

ART 290 Visual Arts Seminar – 3 credits

Builds on prior studio experience within a student’s visual arts concentration. Each student produces a body of thematically linked works that display an advanced level of critical thinking and technical achievement. Students and faculty use regular class meetings for critical discussion and review of work. Student produce work outside of class time.

(Offered: Every Spring)Prereq: Two 200-level courses coded ART